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UK Camping (uk.rec.camping)

Tent pegs



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old August 21st 03, 11:14 PM posted to uk.rec.camping
Chris French
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default Tent pegs

Our Khyam Rigidome comes with some sort of plastic pegs (nylon) they are
of a '+' cross section.

As we found out last weekend, they don't work too well in very sandy
soil and were prone to pull out in the wind, I've also managed to
already break a few so not sure they will be too good in very dry hard
packed ground (like you often get on Mediterranean sites).

For sandy soils I assume a longish 'V' cross section peg is a good bet
(they need to hold a fair load - when pitching the tent all the force of
the wind on the fabric of one side of the tent can be taken by a couple
of pegs) - or are there better suggestions.

And while we are at it what about hard packed ground - just a decent
steel peg? or something better. Weight is not an issue really.
--
Chris French, Leeds
  #2 (permalink)  
Old August 22nd 03, 09:09 PM posted to uk.rec.camping
Chris French
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Posts: 13
Default Tent pegs

In message ,
lid writes
On Thu, 21 Aug 2003 23:14:11 +0100, Chris French
wrote:

For sandy soils I assume a longish 'V' cross section peg is a good bet
(they need to hold a fair load - when pitching the tent all the force of
the wind on the fabric of one side of the tent can be taken by a couple
of pegs) - or are there better suggestions.

If you are camping on or near a beach place a large stone on top of
the peg. The pegs usually stay put.


Assuming the beach has big stones lying around....... (as it happens
this was behind some sand dune and there were not many stone lying about
the campsite.

I have done this before with tent guys, and in fact I did find a big
stone and a lump of concrete block and then tied a piece of cord to the
pegging points on the tent and then around the stone and held a couple
of bits down like that.

But I'd rather have a better solution to the problem.

However, the problem wasn't with the guys (and there is always scope for
finding a new bit of ground with a guy) the problem was with the some of
the pegging points at the base of the tent. The tent sides come right
down near the ground with just a small webbing loop for the peg. There
isn't enough space to weight them down directly with a stone

The tent it tall and with large areas of 'canvas' and the pitching
technique means that the wind force on a large area of material can at
first just be taken by one or two pegs - they just could hold.
--
Chris French, Leeds
  #3 (permalink)  
Old August 22nd 03, 11:17 PM posted to uk.rec.camping
HN
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 43
Default Tent pegs

On Thu, 21 Aug 2003 23:14:11 +0100, Chris French
wrote:

Our Khyam Rigidome comes with some sort of plastic pegs (nylon) they are
of a '+' cross section.

As we found out last weekend, they don't work too well in very sandy
soil and were prone to pull out in the wind, I've also managed to
already break a few so not sure they will be too good in very dry hard
packed ground (like you often get on Mediterranean sites).

For sandy soils I assume a longish 'V' cross section peg is a good bet
(they need to hold a fair load - when pitching the tent all the force of
the wind on the fabric of one side of the tent can be taken by a couple
of pegs) - or are there better suggestions.

And while we are at it what about hard packed ground - just a decent
steel peg? or something better. Weight is not an issue really.


Chris

My solution for very hard ground, is to keep just one good rock peg in
with the plastics ones. Drive the rock peg in first, then withdraw it
and replace it with the ordinary plastic one. Saves a lot of
breakages!

Neil

  #4 (permalink)  
Old August 23rd 03, 05:03 PM posted to uk.rec.camping
KGB[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default Tent pegs

On Fri, 22 Aug 2003 23:17:19 +0100, HN wrote:
SNIP
And while we are at it what about hard packed ground - just a decent
steel peg? or something better. Weight is not an issue really.


Chris

My solution for very hard ground, is to keep just one good rock peg in
with the plastics ones. Drive the rock peg in first, then withdraw it
and replace it with the ordinary plastic one. Saves a lot of
breakages!

Neil


Hi

My wife and I often camp in the US Southwest desert states, where the
ground is almost literally like concrete.

After the first trip and a frustrating attempt to get ordinary
tentpegs into what appeared to be pure sandstone, we now literally
take 6inch nails and a hammer when we go camping over there - 6 inch
nails are much cheaper than expensive "hitech" tentpegs and work just
as well. the hammer we take is a claw hammer to also get the "pegs"
out again.

Incidentally, on really hard ground I would also suggest using a
groundsheet protector. We learned the hard way - after a couple of
trips camping in the desert, the groundsheet on our original tent
looked like a Planetarium when we held it up to the light (full of
little holes)!!

Regards



KGB
  #5 (permalink)  
Old August 23rd 03, 06:19 PM posted to uk.rec.camping
Chris French
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default Tent pegs

In message , KGB
writes
On Fri, 22 Aug 2003 23:17:19 +0100, HN wrote:
SNIP
And while we are at it what about hard packed ground - just a decent
steel peg? or something better. Weight is not an issue really.


My solution for very hard ground, is to keep just one good rock peg in
with the plastics ones.



After the first trip and a frustrating attempt to get ordinary
tentpegs into what appeared to be pure sandstone, we now literally
take 6inch nails and a hammer when we go camping over there


Something to think about. You've not found the small head (compared to
a tent peg) a problem?

Incidentally, on really hard ground I would also suggest using a
groundsheet protector.


Yep always do. I use a bit of polythene sheet with my Spacepacker. For
the Khyam we bought the internal fitted groundsheet which protects the
base of the 'sleeping ' compartments and gives a nice 'floor' for the
'living areas'

--
Chris French, Leeds
  #6 (permalink)  
Old August 23rd 03, 07:37 PM posted to uk.rec.camping
KGB[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default Tent pegs

On Sat, 23 Aug 2003 18:19:30 +0100, Chris French
wrote:

Hi Chris

SNIP
After the first trip and a frustrating attempt to get ordinary
tentpegs into what appeared to be pure sandstone, we now literally
take 6inch nails and a hammer when we go camping over there


Something to think about. You've not found the small head (compared to
a tent peg) a problem?

Never. I originally put washers under the heads because I thought the
small head might be a potential problem. However, after losing a few
washers, I removed them all and have never had a problem despite the
tent (a Wild-Country Hyperspace) having been in almost hurricane force
winds on a couple of occasions.



Incidentally, on really hard ground I would also suggest using a
groundsheet protector.


Yep always do. I use a bit of polythene sheet with my Spacepacker. For
the Khyam we bought the internal fitted groundsheet which protects the
base of the 'sleeping ' compartments and gives a nice 'floor' for the
'living areas'

Our original tent was a "Vango Force 10" and for the first couple of
trips to the US desert we never thought to use a groundsheet
protector. However, when I held it up to the light after the second
trip it was like looking at the night sky - covered in pinprick holes
like stars.

We then invested in the Hyperspace (we wanted a largish good quality
tent because we live in it for up to month at a time in the US) and
rather than pay the exorbitant price for the proper groundsheet
protector bought a cheap plastic "tarp" for around 5 which is just
the right size and more than adequate - (it goes UNDER the groundsheet
rather than inside the tent to protect the tent from stones etc). In
over half a dozen, month-long trips - plus UK usage - there isn't a
single hole in the groundsheet.

Regards




KGB
  #7 (permalink)  
Old August 24th 03, 09:43 PM posted to uk.rec.camping
Chris French
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13
Default Tent pegs

In message , KGB
writes
On Sat, 23 Aug 2003 18:19:30 +0100, Chris French
wrote:

snip

Incidentally, on really hard ground I would also suggest using a
groundsheet protector.


Yep always do. I use a bit of polythene sheet with my Spacepacker. For
the Khyam we bought the internal fitted groundsheet which protects the
base of the 'sleeping ' compartments and gives a nice 'floor' for the
'living areas'


We then invested in the Hyperspace (we wanted a largish good quality
tent because we live in it for up to month at a time in the US) and
rather than pay the exorbitant price for the proper groundsheet
protector bought a cheap plastic "tarp" for around 5 which is just
the right size and more than adequate - (it goes UNDER the groundsheet
rather than inside the tent to protect the tent from stones etc). In
over half a dozen, month-long trips - plus UK usage - there isn't a
single hole in the groundsheet.


I did understand what you meant about under - that's what I meant to
(AFAIK my 10+ year old Spacepacker still has an intact groundsheet)

We did invest in the proper groundsheet for the Kyham as even buying a
cheap tarp for it would have been expensive enough (it's a big tent) It
covers the whole of the inside of the flysheet, so protects the sleeping
compartments and gives a good floor for the large living area which is
useful on damp ground
--
Chris French, Leeds
 



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