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UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

Damp repair



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old October 12th 03, 08:36 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Deano
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Damp repair

Help,

I have just discovered damp on my 1994 Abbey Lincoln van, from the door
frame forward for about 2 inches (I have checked behind the fridge area and
that is all dry) I rebuilt the front of the van about 4 years ago (it was
bought accident damaged) replaced the ABS front with a GRP one (ABS no
longer available), the van was a prototype built just when Cosalt were taken
over by the Swift group.

I think (hope) I have the skills to repair it but would welcome any advice
regarding procedures, materials etc. When I replaced the front, it was
relativly easy all the wooden bits were there but broken so I used the old
bits as a template and made new, then modified the front to take the GRP
panel, I sealed everything with a light blue mastic dispensed from a frame
gun, the awning rails were bedded down with a roll of sealant, I had a good
supply of stainless steel screws and the screw holes were filled with mastic
before fitting the crews and are as water tight as the day they were
installed. but I could kick myself for not checking and re-sealing the door.

My main concerns are replacing the internal wall panel, if I replace partof
the wooden supports whats the best way to join and how to remove the drinks
cabinet it appears to be screwed from the roof lining down? (no problem with
the fridge I remove that during the first 10mins of panic).


Regards

Dean (now checking and re-sealing battery box, toilet rear ABS panel etc)


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old October 13th 03, 08:17 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Stuart Bell
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Posts: 117
Default Damp repair

Deano wrote:

how to remove the drinks
cabinet it appears to be screwed from the roof lining down?


It almost certainly is; they build the insides before adding the outer
shell and roof. Best bet might be a hacksaw blade with one of those
handles that lets you hold it at one end only, and slide it between
cabinet and roof to cut the screws.

Re-fixing is a different question. . . .

Stuart
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  #4 (permalink)  
Old October 13th 03, 03:42 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Harry Bloomfield
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 582
Default Damp repair

In article ,
says...
| My main concerns are replacing the internal wall panel, if I replace partof
| the wooden supports whats the best way to join and how to remove the drinks
| cabinet it appears to be screwed from the roof lining down? (no problem with
| the fridge I remove that during the first 10mins of panic).
|
|

Difficult to reply, when there is no way I can see the damage which
requires repair or its extent. I'm no expert, but I have done the odd
bit of repair at times...

I read somewhere that all damaged wood should be cut out to a distance
of at least 12" past the area of the woods discolouration. I also read
somewhere that car anti-freeze is a good killer of rot in timber.

How to join... I would be thinking along the lines of bolting (or
screwing) new wood alongside the old for some distance, with the
addition of some good wood glue. Metal brackets might also prove useful
in some places.

The normal construction techniques seem to be to build from the inside
out.... Cabinets, roof lining plus insulation, timbers, then finally
the outer skin. So cabinets will be fixed with screws from the outside
through the lining. All you can do is saw through the screws, then when
refixing them use those oblong plastic blocks as a means to refix the
cabinets back to the roof timbers. You might find it useful to add
extra timbers to which you can screw these blocks, before refitting the
roof lining. These plastic blocks are common on self-assembly
furniture.

You might be able to get away with just cutting the points where the
cabinets are fixed to the ceiling, yet leaving the cabinets fixed to
the walls. If so you would then have to slide the lining material over
the top of the cabinets during re-assembly.

The roof linings seem generally to have the polystyrene insulation
fixed to them, with slots cut out of the poly where the timbers run and
the alloy roof just laying on top or glued to the poly. So you might
find yourself removing roof lining, plus insulation. The best way to
deal with this is to find the best match of lining, and buy some poly
insulation cut to just the right thickness by the supplier. Look for
the flame retardant poly. Cut this to be a tight-ish fit between your
timbers and you might consider adding glue to the faces.



--
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Harry (M1BYT)...

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  #5 (permalink)  
Old October 14th 03, 12:54 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
John Manders
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default Damp repair

When I repaired the damp damaged front of my caravan, I built the whole
front panel in solid 1" exterior grade plywood and then cut out the holes
for the windows. The result was solid and not a great deal of extra weight.
I wouldn't suggest a whole side be made that way, but it works around
windows etc. The main advantage I saw was uniformity of wood size and
resistance to any future damp.

John


  #6 (permalink)  
Old October 14th 03, 05:19 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
CaravanParts
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 47
Default Damp repair

John
Just a word of caution, if you use exterior grade ply, and you later have a
leak, you will not know because the damp will stay inside the core, and spread
to other areas doing considerbaly more damage, ie rot before you have spotted
it. The same applies to the vinyl faced plys as the vinyl traps the damp
behind it, but it generally shows early as damp spores bubbling up behind the
vinyl.
Some caravans built back in the late 70's had a paper finish ply which wopuld
show damp in the form of tide marks at an early stage, but enables it to be
caught early and hence minimise the rectification work.

Bob
  #7 (permalink)  
Old October 15th 03, 10:35 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
John Manders
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default Damp repair


"CaravanParts" wrote in message
...
John
Just a word of caution, if you use exterior grade ply, and you later have

a
leak, you will not know because the damp will stay inside the core, and

spread
to other areas doing considerbaly more damage, ie rot before you have

spotted
it. The same applies to the vinyl faced plys as the vinyl traps the damp
behind it, but it generally shows early as damp spores bubbling up behind

the
vinyl.
Some caravans built back in the late 70's had a paper finish ply which

wopuld
show damp in the form of tide marks at an early stage, but enables it to

be
caught early and hence minimise the rectification work.

Bob


Thanks for the comment Bob.
I used 1/4" ply on the inside as per original to make the thickness right
and simply painted that with emulsion. The area doesn't suffer high wear
being largely hidden by curtains etc but should show any future damp
problems quite well. Of course, my workmanship is of such quality that there
won't be any future damp, will there? Must go and watch the pigs fly now.

John


  #8 (permalink)  
Old October 16th 03, 12:55 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Deano
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Damp repair


John Manders wrote in message
...

"CaravanParts" wrote in message
...
John
Just a word of caution, if you use exterior grade ply, and you later

have
a
leak, you will not know because the damp will stay inside the core, and

spread
to other areas doing considerbaly more damage, ie rot before you have

spotted
it. The same applies to the vinyl faced plys as the vinyl traps the

damp
behind it, but it generally shows early as damp spores bubbling up

behind
the
vinyl.
Some caravans built back in the late 70's had a paper finish ply which

wopuld
show damp in the form of tide marks at an early stage, but enables it to

be
caught early and hence minimise the rectification work.

Bob


Thanks for the comment Bob.
I used 1/4" ply on the inside as per original to make the thickness right
and simply painted that with emulsion. The area doesn't suffer high wear
being largely hidden by curtains etc but should show any future damp
problems quite well. Of course, my workmanship is of such quality that

there
won't be any future damp, will there? Must go and watch the pigs fly now.

John


Many thanks for the reply's, they have given me some thoughts regarding the
repair process, but I now have some further questions (sorry)!

1. The wood frame and insulation is glued to the Aluminium but the internal
wall panel appears to be just stapled to the wooden frame, what sort of glue
would be best suited to glueing the new frame to the aluminiun, some sort of
contact adheisive? I have read somewhere that some glues can slowly break
down the insulation?

2. when I remove the internal wall panel I can remove about 12" from the
door to the front of the van, where we meet a natural joint, however the
damp does not go any where near the roof, so is it OK to butt join the
panels horizontally or would I be best removing the internal panel as close
to the ceiling and trying to disguise the joint there, and does this effect
the strength of the wall.

Many thanks

Deno (have now found a metal cutting blade that fits a stanley knife, so the
cocktail cabinet will soon be out)




  #9 (permalink)  
Old October 16th 03, 09:00 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
John Manders
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 95
Default Damp repair

Deno (have now found a metal cutting blade that fits a stanley knife, so
the
cocktail cabinet will soon be out)

If it is held by screws, prepare for a battle. Modern screws can be very
hard. A normal saw may not touch it.
For the glue, I have used "No Nails" with success. Beware of cheap imitators
though.

John


  #10 (permalink)  
Old October 16th 03, 10:54 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Ian Cooper
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Damp repair

Always insert a piece of batten to back a join. Cut away the foam on the
original to insert it between the two sides. Try and clamp the 'sandwich' if
you can - it'll be a lot stronger. Better still use a two part impact
adhesive. You can't use Evostic as it dissolves the foam. I just tried a web
search and came up with this though http://www.glue-shop.com/info2.htm. The
Gell would be worth a try I'd say.

Ian

"Deano" wrote in message
...

John Manders wrote in message
...

"CaravanParts" wrote in message
...
John
Just a word of caution, if you use exterior grade ply, and you later

have
a
leak, you will not know because the damp will stay inside the core,

and
spread
to other areas doing considerbaly more damage, ie rot before you have

spotted
it. The same applies to the vinyl faced plys as the vinyl traps the

damp
behind it, but it generally shows early as damp spores bubbling up

behind
the
vinyl.
Some caravans built back in the late 70's had a paper finish ply which

wopuld
show damp in the form of tide marks at an early stage, but enables it

to
be
caught early and hence minimise the rectification work.

Bob


Thanks for the comment Bob.
I used 1/4" ply on the inside as per original to make the thickness

right
and simply painted that with emulsion. The area doesn't suffer high wear
being largely hidden by curtains etc but should show any future damp
problems quite well. Of course, my workmanship is of such quality that

there
won't be any future damp, will there? Must go and watch the pigs fly

now.

John


Many thanks for the reply's, they have given me some thoughts regarding

the
repair process, but I now have some further questions (sorry)!

1. The wood frame and insulation is glued to the Aluminium but the

internal
wall panel appears to be just stapled to the wooden frame, what sort of

glue
would be best suited to glueing the new frame to the aluminiun, some sort

of
contact adheisive? I have read somewhere that some glues can slowly break
down the insulation?

2. when I remove the internal wall panel I can remove about 12" from the
door to the front of the van, where we meet a natural joint, however the
damp does not go any where near the roof, so is it OK to butt join the
panels horizontally or would I be best removing the internal panel as

close
to the ceiling and trying to disguise the joint there, and does this

effect
the strength of the wall.

Many thanks

Deno (have now found a metal cutting blade that fits a stanley knife, so

the
cocktail cabinet will soon be out)






 



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