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Suggestions for diagnosing and repair of Fiat Turbo



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old August 1st 03, 07:07 AM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
dr
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Suggestions for diagnosing and repair of Fiat Turbo

Anyone suggestions as to how I get a turbo problem diagnosed in South
Bedfordshire on a Fiat 2.8iTD (Benimar MH - 13000 miles since 1999)?

Normal (non Fiat - service agent says "ooh Turbo problem can't really
help" - Turbo specialists all happy to provide parts but no diagnosis or
fitting - was meant to be on a ferry now so pretty brassed off as you can
tell. Don't really want to go the franchise route - too far to travel, too
expensive when I get there but its getting to the point that if I don't - no
hols!)

Help!

David


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old August 1st 03, 01:36 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Les Rose
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 45
Default Suggestions for diagnosing and repair of Fiat Turbo


"dr" wrote in message
...
Anyone suggestions as to how I get a turbo problem diagnosed in South
Bedfordshire on a Fiat 2.8iTD (Benimar MH - 13000 miles since 1999)?

Normal (non Fiat - service agent says "ooh Turbo problem can't really
help" - Turbo specialists all happy to provide parts but no diagnosis or
fitting - was meant to be on a ferry now so pretty brassed off as you can
tell. Don't really want to go the franchise route - too far to travel,

too
expensive when I get there but its getting to the point that if I don't -

no
hols!)

Help!

David


It would help to know what the problem is. Is it control system or bearing
noise (for example)? Very unlikely to be the latter at that mileage. If it
is, the unit was faulty as they go way over 100k miles usually. Sorry, I
don't know anyone who can help but I suspect a new turbo is needed.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old August 1st 03, 05:40 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
dr
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default Suggestions for diagnosing and repair of Fiat Turbo

"Les Rose" wrote in message
...

"dr" wrote in message
...
Anyone suggestions as to how I get a turbo problem diagnosed in South
Bedfordshire on a Fiat 2.8iTD (Benimar MH - 13000 miles since 1999)?

Normal (non Fiat - service agent says "ooh Turbo problem can't really
help" - Turbo specialists all happy to provide parts but no diagnosis or
fitting - was meant to be on a ferry now so pretty brassed off as you

can
tell. Don't really want to go the franchise route - too far to travel,

too
expensive when I get there but its getting to the point that if I

don't -
no
hols!)

Help!

David


It would help to know what the problem is. Is it control system or bearing
noise (for example)? Very unlikely to be the latter at that mileage. If it
is, the unit was faulty as they go way over 100k miles usually. Sorry, I
don't know anyone who can help but I suspect a new turbo is needed.


Les

Thanks for that, having visited a half dozen places, and been turned down
flat in as many more a Turbo specialist in Luton has taken on the cause,
lots of iron filings in the pipework points to the turbo being shot, though
at 4 years and 12k miles this absolutely should not be the case so we need
to find out what caused it! We shall see.

All the best

David



  #4 (permalink)  
Old August 2nd 03, 01:07 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
hoot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Suggestions for diagnosing and repair of Fiat Turbo

Your oil pipe to your turbo may be blocked
Use good oil
let the engine run at idel for 30 seconds before you turn your engine off
(too cool your turbo)

Fiat turbos are not the most reliable (I've had 2 go pop on me)


  #5 (permalink)  
Old August 5th 03, 09:44 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Les Rose
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 45
Default Suggestions for diagnosing and repair of Fiat Turbo


"dr" wrote in message
...
"Les Rose" wrote in message
...

"dr" wrote in message
...
Anyone suggestions as to how I get a turbo problem diagnosed in South
Bedfordshire on a Fiat 2.8iTD (Benimar MH - 13000 miles since 1999)?

Normal (non Fiat - service agent says "ooh Turbo problem can't really
help" - Turbo specialists all happy to provide parts but no diagnosis

or
fitting - was meant to be on a ferry now so pretty brassed off as you

can
tell. Don't really want to go the franchise route - too far to

travel,
too
expensive when I get there but its getting to the point that if I

don't -
no
hols!)

Help!

David


It would help to know what the problem is. Is it control system or

bearing
noise (for example)? Very unlikely to be the latter at that mileage. If

it
is, the unit was faulty as they go way over 100k miles usually. Sorry, I
don't know anyone who can help but I suspect a new turbo is needed.


Les

Thanks for that, having visited a half dozen places, and been turned down
flat in as many more a Turbo specialist in Luton has taken on the cause,
lots of iron filings in the pipework points to the turbo being shot,

though
at 4 years and 12k miles this absolutely should not be the case so we need
to find out what caused it! We shall see.

All the best

David




Hm...sounds like bearing failure due to lack of oil - they are fed from the
engine normally. Of course you have to observe a few precautions such as
letting them idle for a few secs before stopping the engine, or the bearings
get fried. But most drivers know this. Anyway your specialist will be 100
times more expert than me so I'll be interested to hear the diagnosis.


  #6 (permalink)  
Old August 20th 03, 05:18 AM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
AC
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default Suggestions for diagnosing and repair of Fiat Turbo

In article , Les Rose
writes
Of course you have to observe a few precautions
such as letting them idle for a few secs before stopping the engine, or
the bearings get fried. But most drivers know this.


Thanks for mentioning it!
As a new fiat turbo user, I did not know this (2002 2.0 ducato TD)......

is it relevant to all turbo engines?
--
AC
  #7 (permalink)  
Old August 20th 03, 06:08 AM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
CampinGazz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 339
Default Suggestions for diagnosing and repair of Fiat Turbo


"AC" wrote in message
...
In article , Les Rose
writes
Of course you have to observe a few precautions
such as letting them idle for a few secs before stopping the engine, or
the bearings get fried. But most drivers know this.


Thanks for mentioning it!
As a new fiat turbo user, I did not know this (2002 2.0 ducato TD)......

is it relevant to all turbo engines?


Yup, the turbo spins at upto 100,000 rpm, and is fed a constiant high
pressure feed of oil, that keeps the turbine spindle cool by taking away the
head created by the exhaust gasses spinning the turbine wheel, but also
suspends the turbine shaft slightly in the film of oil,

say your doing 70 down the motorway, suddenly decide to call in at a service
area for a pee and a ham sandwich (you only have a tenner on you
you pull into a parking space and shut the engine off,
5 seconds ago you were doing 70, prolly running at near full throttle, so
near full boost, so the turbo was spinning fast, it takes a few seconds for
something spinning at upto 100,000 rpm to come to a rest, so the turbo is
still spinning away when you shut the engine down,

What happens next is the oil supply is shut off, so the turbine shaft is no
longer suspended in the oil film, so the shaft usually drops onto the
bearings and stalls out, not a good thing to happen,
but more importiantly the oil that was cooling the turbo is removed, so all
the heat from the exhaust has no where to go, heat soak set in, and the
turbo increases in temperature,

it can get so hot at the bearings that the residule oil thats left around
the bearings gets turned to carbon!

So when ever you've been running at high speed/heavy load, if you have to
pull over quickly, let the engine sit at idle for a few seconds, this allows
the turbine to come to a stop (or near a stop) and some of the heat to be
carried away with the oil retunring to the sump, and generaly let the
exhaust cool down,

If your planning a stop, you can drive slower for the last mile or so, just
let up on the loud pedal for a little while, and let the engine cool down a
bit, then when you stop to park up just let the engine idle for a second or
3 before shutting off.

You can buy turbo timers that keeps the engine running untill the
exhaust/turbo drops to a certian safe temperature,
they dont seem to be that popular, not many people seem to like having the
engine running while you've got the keys in your pocket and are walking away
from the van, and with modern engines it's harder to hook them up, the
imobilizer will cut the engine out when you remove the key.

All this is relevent to all turbo engines, even more so to petrol turbo
engines as they run a higher exhaust gas temperature than a diesel engine,
if you like extra gauges that let you know whats going on under the bonnet
(i do, i want to know whats going on and give me time to correct it/prevent
things getting worse, the volt meter showed up a failing alternator
regulator a few years back, the idiot light would have never came on untill
the battery was flat, fridge de-frosted and the regulator totaly shot,
prolly taking out other parts of the alternator/wiring in the process)
but a gauge thats very handy to have is an exhaust gas temperature gauge
(EGT gauge), they're not cheap, but are very handy, it's the only gauge that
can tell you when to back off the throttle when climbing a mountian pass,
before the engine tells you by dumping the oul on the road

the iveco daily van i have has a very handy bolt blocking a welded in nut in
the exhaust downpipe, just after the turbo, seems it's there for an EGT
gauge, not sure if the fiat vans have that there, or with it being a new
van, there's even places to put extra gauges,
before you do anything, if its a HDI engine then the EGT is possibaly
monitored by the engine computer, you have a lot more to worry about with a
HDI engine than excessive EGT (like the day the fuel pump goes, and saving
the 2 grand up to replace it


  #8 (permalink)  
Old August 20th 03, 06:24 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
AC
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 83
Default Suggestions for diagnosing and repair of Fiat Turbo

In article , CampinGazz
writes

[..good stuff...]

if its a HDI engine then the EGT is possibaly monitored by the
engine computer, you have a lot more to worry about with a HDI engine
than excessive EGT (like the day the fuel pump goes, and saving the 2
grand up to replace it


Thanks, much appreciated.

All I can find is 'JTD' there seems no mention of HDI. I guess TD means
turbo diesel, do not know what the J might stand for. Is HDI a generic
technology of would I have a way of finding out?

--
Alan Cocks Berkshire UK
 



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