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Visiting Norway


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  #1 (permalink)  
Old January 13th 04, 05:27 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Mark[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 30
Default Visiting Norway

We're looking for advice and information on visiting Norway
from the UK. Routes, prices, ferries, camping etc.

All help gratefully received.
Mark.
(spam blocker, remove _planet to reply by email.)


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old January 13th 04, 07:53 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Bob Douglas
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 275
Default Visiting Norway


"Mark" wrote in message
...
We're looking for advice and information on visiting Norway
from the UK. Routes, prices, ferries, camping etc.

All help gratefully received.
Mark.


Mark,

from my experience, much recommended.

We have been to Norway three times, once by public transport, once with a
camper, and most recent (2001) with a coachbuilt.

For scenery, and touring, spectacular and unlike most other accessible areas
of Europe.

If you are thinking of going in prime holiday season, however, it is not a
cheap option for travel to get there (unless you want a circuitous route).

Unless you have a small camper, there is (IMO) only one viable option for
travel to Norway in season, which is the Fjiord Line crossing from Newcastle
to Bergen (the DFDS sailings to Norway or Sweden do not take overheight
vehicles or caravans in high season).

This is expensive, but is a comfortable boat and drops you conveniently in
Bergen as a good starting point for touring.

If not high season, then DFDS from Newcastle (to Kristiansand?) used to be
cheaper (but it is to Southern Norway, we always favoured the North).

Other alternatives in season are DFDS to Denmark, or Stena Harwich-Hook and
drive (all bridges now if you select your route carefully), but a bit of a
waste of time if you'd rather be in Norway than driving!

There is a possibility via the Shetlands (P&O?) and onwards via the Smyril
Line to Bergen, but again, never looked in detail at this due to time and
perceived cost of two ferries.

The Camping and Caravanning club have discounts on Fjiord Line (only 5% I
think) and I suspect similar from Caravan Club.

There are numerous campsites in Norway (and some 'rough' camping). I
downloaded a PDF brochure from a website ( ) for my 2001 break. Though
it stays light very late in summer (that should probably be very early, I've
read newspapers outside well after midnight), steep and deep fjiords mean
direct sun often disappears quite early.

Fuel (either) much the same price as UK last time we were there (diesel used
to be much cheaper).

Touring is much simpler than it used to be due to comprehensive tunnel
building (they go everywhere and are generally non-toll - even Europe's
longest), but as a result somewhat less interesting (this is only
relative!).

Ferries are still a way of life, and if you're used to Channel prices, the
fares will be a pleasant surprise *as long as your outfit is less than 6m* -
the break point here on fares is steep. (We generally managed to get away
with a 5.9m van with a bike rack on!).

Norwegian Tourist Board (London) provide area travel guides and ferry
timetables (with pricing) by post. These are invaluable as planning tools
for a touring itinerary. Even long ferries can be economic, and definitely
scenic.

Campsites generally decent but vary in quality/facilities. They are quite
often remote. Most have kitchens with electric hotplates etc for cooking
that can eke your gas out if you need (though you may have to queue). Prices
were around the higher end of the scale for Europe.

In my opinion (maybe advised by our first tour years ago) is that prices in
Supermarkets are not as high as everyone seems to expect, and certainly the
availability and variety of supplies has improved dramatically (all the
tunnels have speeded goods transport). Worth taking some staples, but
general provisions no great issue.

In general, anything that involves service (restaurant meals etc.) is
expensive. In addition, alcohol is prohibitive in bars, and anything
stronger than beer is difficult to get hold of to take-away (state monopoly)
and also expensive. Beer, on the other hand, is available in supermarkets,
and around UK prices (i.e.. not prohibitive, but not like mainland Europe).

Remember, Norway is not EU, so duty-free imports are severely limited (but
there was absolutely no check on our last visit - and no we didn't - damn!)

Credit cards patch in acceptance (even for fuel), and inconsistent even
between garages in the same chain, especially the further north we went. We
found most Coop supermarkets took them for supplies, but worth being topped
up with cash (ATMs no problem anywhere).

Norway is a big place, and it takes time to travel distances (especially
with ferries). We took three weeks last time and went from Bergen well past
the Arctic circle, beyond Narvik and onto the Vesteralen. Absolutely
stunning, but the mid part of the journey less interesting than both ends.
To get the best (especially with a motorcaravan, you need to travel around).

Norwegians very friendly, and the great majority speak almost perfect
English. (I'm one of those that likes to try the local language, but
Norwegian can be a challenge!).

Hope this helps.

Bob


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  #3 (permalink)  
Old January 13th 04, 08:29 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Mark[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 30
Default Visiting Norway

Bob

Thanks for the comprehensive information - more than I could have
hoped for. The only thing putting us off at the moment is the ferry
prices, went to Germany last year for £200, quotes so far of around
£800 - more research needed there!

Thanks again
Mark


"Bob Douglas" wrote in message
...

"Mark" wrote in message
...
We're looking for advice and information on visiting Norway
from the UK. Routes, prices, ferries, camping etc.

All help gratefully received.
Mark.


Mark,

from my experience, much recommended.

We have been to Norway three times, once by public transport, once with a
camper, and most recent (2001) with a coachbuilt.

For scenery, and touring, spectacular and unlike most other accessible

areas
of Europe.

If you are thinking of going in prime holiday season, however, it is not a
cheap option for travel to get there (unless you want a circuitous route).

Unless you have a small camper, there is (IMO) only one viable option for
travel to Norway in season, which is the Fjiord Line crossing from

Newcastle
to Bergen (the DFDS sailings to Norway or Sweden do not take overheight
vehicles or caravans in high season).

This is expensive, but is a comfortable boat and drops you conveniently in
Bergen as a good starting point for touring.

If not high season, then DFDS from Newcastle (to Kristiansand?) used to be
cheaper (but it is to Southern Norway, we always favoured the North).

Other alternatives in season are DFDS to Denmark, or Stena Harwich-Hook

and
drive (all bridges now if you select your route carefully), but a bit of a
waste of time if you'd rather be in Norway than driving!

There is a possibility via the Shetlands (P&O?) and onwards via the Smyril
Line to Bergen, but again, never looked in detail at this due to time and
perceived cost of two ferries.

The Camping and Caravanning club have discounts on Fjiord Line (only 5% I
think) and I suspect similar from Caravan Club.

There are numerous campsites in Norway (and some 'rough' camping). I
downloaded a PDF brochure from a website ( ) for my 2001 break.

Though
it stays light very late in summer (that should probably be very early,

I've
read newspapers outside well after midnight), steep and deep fjiords mean
direct sun often disappears quite early.

Fuel (either) much the same price as UK last time we were there (diesel

used
to be much cheaper).

Touring is much simpler than it used to be due to comprehensive tunnel
building (they go everywhere and are generally non-toll - even Europe's
longest), but as a result somewhat less interesting (this is only
relative!).

Ferries are still a way of life, and if you're used to Channel prices, the
fares will be a pleasant surprise *as long as your outfit is less than

6m* -
the break point here on fares is steep. (We generally managed to get away
with a 5.9m van with a bike rack on!).

Norwegian Tourist Board (London) provide area travel guides and ferry
timetables (with pricing) by post. These are invaluable as planning tools
for a touring itinerary. Even long ferries can be economic, and definitely
scenic.

Campsites generally decent but vary in quality/facilities. They are quite
often remote. Most have kitchens with electric hotplates etc for cooking
that can eke your gas out if you need (though you may have to queue).

Prices
were around the higher end of the scale for Europe.

In my opinion (maybe advised by our first tour years ago) is that prices

in
Supermarkets are not as high as everyone seems to expect, and certainly

the
availability and variety of supplies has improved dramatically (all the
tunnels have speeded goods transport). Worth taking some staples, but
general provisions no great issue.

In general, anything that involves service (restaurant meals etc.) is
expensive. In addition, alcohol is prohibitive in bars, and anything
stronger than beer is difficult to get hold of to take-away (state

monopoly)
and also expensive. Beer, on the other hand, is available in supermarkets,
and around UK prices (i.e.. not prohibitive, but not like mainland

Europe).

Remember, Norway is not EU, so duty-free imports are severely limited (but
there was absolutely no check on our last visit - and no we didn't -

damn!)

Credit cards patch in acceptance (even for fuel), and inconsistent even
between garages in the same chain, especially the further north we went.

We
found most Coop supermarkets took them for supplies, but worth being

topped
up with cash (ATMs no problem anywhere).

Norway is a big place, and it takes time to travel distances (especially
with ferries). We took three weeks last time and went from Bergen well

past
the Arctic circle, beyond Narvik and onto the Vesteralen. Absolutely
stunning, but the mid part of the journey less interesting than both ends.
To get the best (especially with a motorcaravan, you need to travel

around).

Norwegians very friendly, and the great majority speak almost perfect
English. (I'm one of those that likes to try the local language, but
Norwegian can be a challenge!).

Hope this helps.

Bob


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Antispam measures in force - remove nobumf from address to reply
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 00





  #4 (permalink)  
Old January 13th 04, 08:57 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Knut Grøneng
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default Visiting Norway

From a nativ Norwegianer some tip along the road (the main idea is suitable
for a 3 week tour):

Arriving in Bergen you can stay at "Bergen Bobilparkering" Bobil is
motorhome in Norwegian it is a few hundred meters to the left along the
seaside from the ferry.
It is a few nice places in Bergen, and the guard at the parking is usually
helpfull with info.

Going north, follow the coast, and try to find Atlanterhavsveien
http://www.atlanterhavsveien.no/e_index.html from this you have a few
options before the start of RV17 in Namsos.

http://www.rv17.no/index.krv?page=oversikt&lng=en is the road along the
coast of a long part with very scenic traveling.
I would then take the ferry from Bodø to Lofoten to see this long row of
islands (and few ferries).

You should then start calculating how many days you have to hit the ferry
back home again. Have a week to use the E6 to Otta and then turn right to
Stryn.
If you dare, use the old road over the mountain and not the tunnels, but it
is steep downhill.
Any day extra could be used on a sidetrip to Geiranger. (Dalsnibba on a
short sideroad is a 1600m peak with road to the top overlooking the fiord.

From Stryn you have the option to travel southward over Fjærland (tollroad
due to a tunnel under a glacier) to Lærdal and test the long tunnel to
Aurland and Gudvangen (no toll) - it is one short just before Lærdal.

On the trip you will find some parking spots for motorhomes for overnight
stays.

The general rule is that overnight parking is permitted, but respect signs
restricting it on a few crowded places.
Camping places cost you from NOK 70 to NOK 300 pr. night, usually less than
NOK 150.
Electricity hookup is NOK 20 to NOK 30 most places, so I do not bother
during summer trips.

If you should run out of gas for your stove it is possible to rent a
Norwegian bottle for the trip - ask at a Statoil station.

Knut

"Bob Douglas" skrev i melding
...

"Mark" wrote in message
...
We're looking for advice and information on visiting Norway
from the UK. Routes, prices, ferries, camping etc.

All help gratefully received.
Mark.


Mark,

from my experience, much recommended.

We have been to Norway three times, once by public transport, once with a
camper, and most recent (2001) with a coachbuilt.

For scenery, and touring, spectacular and unlike most other accessible

areas
of Europe.

..........



  #5 (permalink)  
Old January 13th 04, 09:11 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Mark[_12_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 30
Default Visiting Norway

Knut

Thanks for the information - I think it was you who helped us out last year
with Stelplatz in Germany - had a great time and found the sites you
recommended by the Mosel.

Thanks
Mark

"Knut Grøneng" wrote in message
...
From a nativ Norwegianer some tip along the road (the main idea is

suitable
for a 3 week tour):

Arriving in Bergen you can stay at "Bergen Bobilparkering" Bobil is
motorhome in Norwegian it is a few hundred meters to the left along the
seaside from the ferry.
It is a few nice places in Bergen, and the guard at the parking is usually
helpfull with info.

Going north, follow the coast, and try to find Atlanterhavsveien
http://www.atlanterhavsveien.no/e_index.html from this you have a few
options before the start of RV17 in Namsos.

http://www.rv17.no/index.krv?page=oversikt&lng=en is the road along the
coast of a long part with very scenic traveling.
I would then take the ferry from Bodø to Lofoten to see this long row of
islands (and few ferries).

You should then start calculating how many days you have to hit the ferry
back home again. Have a week to use the E6 to Otta and then turn right to
Stryn.
If you dare, use the old road over the mountain and not the tunnels, but

it
is steep downhill.
Any day extra could be used on a sidetrip to Geiranger. (Dalsnibba on a
short sideroad is a 1600m peak with road to the top overlooking the fiord.

From Stryn you have the option to travel southward over Fjærland (tollroad
due to a tunnel under a glacier) to Lærdal and test the long tunnel to
Aurland and Gudvangen (no toll) - it is one short just before Lærdal.

On the trip you will find some parking spots for motorhomes for overnight
stays.

The general rule is that overnight parking is permitted, but respect signs
restricting it on a few crowded places.
Camping places cost you from NOK 70 to NOK 300 pr. night, usually less

than
NOK 150.
Electricity hookup is NOK 20 to NOK 30 most places, so I do not bother
during summer trips.

If you should run out of gas for your stove it is possible to rent a
Norwegian bottle for the trip - ask at a Statoil station.

Knut

"Bob Douglas" skrev i melding
...

"Mark" wrote in message
...
We're looking for advice and information on visiting Norway
from the UK. Routes, prices, ferries, camping etc.

All help gratefully received.
Mark.


Mark,

from my experience, much recommended.

We have been to Norway three times, once by public transport, once with

a
camper, and most recent (2001) with a coachbuilt.

For scenery, and touring, spectacular and unlike most other accessible

areas
of Europe.

.........





  #6 (permalink)  
Old January 13th 04, 09:35 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Bob Douglas
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 275
Default Visiting Norway

"Mark" wrote in message
news
Bob

Thanks for the comprehensive information - more than I could have
hoped for. The only thing putting us off at the moment is the ferry
prices, went to Germany last year for £200, quotes so far of around
£800 - more research needed there!

Thanks again
Mark




Mark,

yes, that's the rub.

I don't think you'll do much cheaper in season. (discount via the club(s)
effectively gives you free membership at least).

(driving from the shorter sea crossings still requires bridge tolls or a
second ferry, and loses you time).

If you can afford it, it is worth it.

I think I failed in adding the website to my previous www.camping.no has
downloadable campsite guide (PDF and not small!)

Would support Knut's comments on getting to the Lofoten islands, but it's
asignifcant drive.

Bob

--
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Antispam measures in force - remove nobumf from address to reply
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  #7 (permalink)  
Old January 14th 04, 06:31 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Ulrike Messerschmidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7
Default Visiting Norway

Hello,

Mark schrieb:

We're looking for advice and information on visiting Norway
from the UK. Routes, prices, ferries, camping etc.


Bob gave you an almost 100% information. So my job is only to add some
links:
http://www.camping.no Download of a Guide (pdf)
http://www.visitnorway.com General information

I recommend you to purchase the following road atlas:

Veiatlas Norge
published by Statens Kartverk (http://www.statkart.no)
1:300 000
ISBN 82-7945-002-5

You should get it at any good book shop in the UK. It lists all the
waste disposal sites all over Norway.

Regards,

Uli (Graz, Austria)


  #8 (permalink)  
Old February 9th 04, 03:48 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Grant Kay
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Bobil......!

What a great name! And thanks for all the great info better than the mags!



"Knut Grøneng" wrote in message
...
From a nativ Norwegianer some tip along the road (the main idea is

suitable
for a 3 week tour):

Arriving in Bergen you can stay at "Bergen Bobilparkering" Bobil is
motorhome in Norwegian it is a few hundred meters to the left along the
seaside from the ferry.
It is a few nice places in Bergen, and the guard at the parking is usually
helpfull with info.

Going north, follow the coast, and try to find Atlanterhavsveien
http://www.atlanterhavsveien.no/e_index.html from this you have a few
options before the start of RV17 in Namsos.

http://www.rv17.no/index.krv?page=oversikt&lng=en is the road along the
coast of a long part with very scenic traveling.
I would then take the ferry from Bodø to Lofoten to see this long row of
islands (and few ferries).

You should then start calculating how many days you have to hit the ferry
back home again. Have a week to use the E6 to Otta and then turn right to
Stryn.
If you dare, use the old road over the mountain and not the tunnels, but

it
is steep downhill.
Any day extra could be used on a sidetrip to Geiranger. (Dalsnibba on a
short sideroad is a 1600m peak with road to the top overlooking the fiord.

From Stryn you have the option to travel southward over Fjærland (tollroad
due to a tunnel under a glacier) to Lærdal and test the long tunnel to
Aurland and Gudvangen (no toll) - it is one short just before Lærdal.

On the trip you will find some parking spots for motorhomes for overnight
stays.

The general rule is that overnight parking is permitted, but respect signs
restricting it on a few crowded places.
Camping places cost you from NOK 70 to NOK 300 pr. night, usually less

than
NOK 150.
Electricity hookup is NOK 20 to NOK 30 most places, so I do not bother
during summer trips.

If you should run out of gas for your stove it is possible to rent a
Norwegian bottle for the trip - ask at a Statoil station.

Knut

"Bob Douglas" skrev i melding
...

"Mark" wrote in message
...
We're looking for advice and information on visiting Norway
from the UK. Routes, prices, ferries, camping etc.

All help gratefully received.
Mark.


Mark,

from my experience, much recommended.

We have been to Norway three times, once by public transport, once with

a
camper, and most recent (2001) with a coachbuilt.

For scenery, and touring, spectacular and unlike most other accessible

areas
of Europe.

.........





 


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