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Gas- blue cylinder



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old April 7th 04, 02:41 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Hilary[_2_]
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Posts: 36
Default Gas- blue cylinder

Does the gas lose its oomph when it gets older??? Or is it as I suspect that
the valve in the bottle gets corroded and doesnt open as far as it should?

We just changed the almost full cylinder to one with only a small amount of
gas left, but a more recently puchased one I think. After a few seconds of
burning through the rings on the cooker picked up more pressure, so did the
the cooker. I thought things were taking slightly longer to cook.

We just tried the water heater ( see earlier post) and after a couple of
refusals it powered into life. Could it be the gas all along?

TIA

)


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old April 7th 04, 06:43 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
riccip
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Posts: 106
Default Gas- blue cylinder

"Hilary" wrote:

Does the gas lose its oomph when it gets older??? Or is it as I suspect that
the valve in the bottle gets corroded and doesnt open as far as it should?

We just changed the almost full cylinder to one with only a small amount of
gas left, but a more recently puchased one I think. After a few seconds of
burning through the rings on the cooker picked up more pressure, so did the
the cooker. I thought things were taking slightly longer to cook.

We just tried the water heater ( see earlier post) and after a couple of
refusals it powered into life. Could it be the gas all along?


Quite possibly. The gas itself can't chemically change and lasts
indefinitely, although I would imagine that over time in a partly
used cylinder the liquified gas would settle to the bottom
leaving thinner-than-normal gas in the void above. Same thing can
also happen in cold weather. The best thing with an old, little
used cylinder is to give it a good shake before using and maybe
let out a some gas outside in the open air.

riccip
  #3 (permalink)  
Old April 7th 04, 08:19 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
TP
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Posts: 207
Default Gas- blue cylinder

riccip wrote:

The best thing with an old, little
used cylinder is to give it a good shake before using and maybe
let out a some gas outside in the open air.


let out a some gas outside in the open air ?????

Are you tired of living?


  #4 (permalink)  
Old April 7th 04, 08:58 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
riccip[_2_]
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Posts: 1
Default Gas- blue cylinder

TP wrote:

let out a some gas outside in the open air ?????


Why not? I bet you do it all the time.

Are you tired of living?


Assume a no-smoking warning.
Otherwise you're safe enough.

riccip
  #5 (permalink)  
Old April 8th 04, 10:23 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
ROBIN DUMPLETON
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Posts: 210
Default Gas- blue cylinder

Quite an interesting assessment of a cylinder of gas. The cylinder acts as a
vapouriser to change the butanes state from liquid to gas. In cold weather
this means that as the gas expands it chills down. It can reach the boiling
point of the gas which is -1C so the gas pressure in the cylinder drops.
Sometimes because the gas is not pure you may find that it has some propane
in it which has a boiling point at -41C and a vapour pressure much higher
than the butane. No amount of shaking will do anything to the gas in the
cylinder and can result in liquid getting into the low pressure vapour
system with dire consequences.

Robin

"riccip" wrote in message
...
"Hilary" wrote:

Does the gas lose its oomph when it gets older??? Or is it as I suspect

that
the valve in the bottle gets corroded and doesnt open as far as it

should?

We just changed the almost full cylinder to one with only a small amount

of
gas left, but a more recently puchased one I think. After a few seconds

of
burning through the rings on the cooker picked up more pressure, so did

the
the cooker. I thought things were taking slightly longer to cook.

We just tried the water heater ( see earlier post) and after a couple of
refusals it powered into life. Could it be the gas all along?


Quite possibly. The gas itself can't chemically change and lasts
indefinitely, although I would imagine that over time in a partly
used cylinder the liquified gas would settle to the bottom
leaving thinner-than-normal gas in the void above. Same thing can
also happen in cold weather. The best thing with an old, little
used cylinder is to give it a good shake before using and maybe
let out a some gas outside in the open air.

riccip



  #6 (permalink)  
Old April 9th 04, 01:27 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
riccip[_3_]
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Posts: 1
Default Gas- blue cylinder

"ROBIN DUMPLETON" wrote:

No amount of shaking will do anything to the gas in the
cylinder and can result in liquid getting into the low pressure vapour
system with dire consequences.


Absolute twaddle. Show me in the faq from whence you gleaned your
info where it says agitating the cylinder is dangerous! The best
you'll find is advice not to store it on it's side. Whenever the
subject of gas crops up there's always some doom merchant pipes
up with predictions of a catastrophic explosion. Whatever you say
the gas in the part-empty area of a cylinder which has stood for
some time becomes stale and tainted, possibly through reaction
with the cylinder lining. A shake and/or venting this gas has it
burning smoothly again through camping appliances.

riccip
  #7 (permalink)  
Old April 9th 04, 05:03 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
texterted
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Posts: 1
Default Gas- blue cylinder


"Hilary" wrote in message
...
Does the gas lose its oomph when it gets older??? Or is it as I suspect

that
the valve in the bottle gets corroded and doesnt open as far as it should?

We just changed the almost full cylinder to one with only a small amount

of
gas left, but a more recently puchased one I think. After a few seconds

of
burning through the rings on the cooker picked up more pressure, so did

the
the cooker. I thought things were taking slightly longer to cook.

We just tried the water heater ( see earlier post) and after a couple of
refusals it powered into life. Could it be the gas all along?

TIA


Its too cold for butane yet... change to propane, with a red bottle and
things will probably work.

Good luck


  #8 (permalink)  
Old April 9th 04, 06:15 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Hilary[_2_]
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Posts: 36
Default Gas- blue cylinder


"texterted" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Its too cold for butane yet... change to propane, with a red bottle and
things will probably work.

Ah I'd forgotten about the temperature? Funnily enough it did get colder
the second night. We have meant to change over to red bottle permanently
( we dont use much gas the slight difference between the 2 is probably
negligable) but we still have some blue to go. I'm all for ditching the
blue cylinders but him indoors has a mean streak !!

The boiler is only a few months off its annual service so I think I'll get
it done early to be safe.

)


  #9 (permalink)  
Old April 10th 04, 01:18 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Richard Murphy
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Posts: 39
Default Gas- blue cylinder

What was the weather lime - if below about 4 or 5 deg celsius, Butane won't
evaporate - worse if the bottle is nearly empty. Thats why you get Ptopane
(orange bottles) instead.


"Hilary" wrote in message
...
Does the gas lose its oomph when it gets older??? Or is it as I suspect

that
the valve in the bottle gets corroded and doesnt open as far as it should?

We just changed the almost full cylinder to one with only a small amount

of
gas left, but a more recently puchased one I think. After a few seconds

of
burning through the rings on the cooker picked up more pressure, so did

the
the cooker. I thought things were taking slightly longer to cook.

We just tried the water heater ( see earlier post) and after a couple of
refusals it powered into life. Could it be the gas all along?

TIA

)




  #10 (permalink)  
Old April 10th 04, 05:00 PM posted to uk.rec.motorcaravans
Leyland_Leopard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 225
Default Gas- blue cylinder

"texterted" wrote in message
news:[email protected]


Its too cold for butane yet... change to propane, with a red bottle and
things will probably work.

Good luck

Having said that, we've used butane since buying our caravan last July (it
was what the dealer supplied, and we are still on our first of the two
supplied cylinders). We even used it over New Year, when we had overnight
frosts. The only caveat being that we had to wait until about 10.00am or so
for our breakfast bacon butties - as the gas had thawed by then (even though
the ice on the car hadn't).

I had planned to switch over to propane - but have seen no need to do so,
yet.

We only use gas for cooking - using electricity to heat water, and taking
our own electric heater, only using the gas heater on board to take the edge
of the cold.


 



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