A Caravan forum. Caravan Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Caravan Banter forum » Caravan, Motor Homes and Camping Newsgroups » UK Motor Caravans
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

UK Motor Caravans (uk.rec.motorcaravans)

MotorHome questions. Got one?



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 11:05 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?

On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...


The Ravenna is not the best model to buy - not least because the rear
L-shaped seating layout precludes carrying passengers in the back.

Yes, they fit one seat belt - but because the seat is at the extreme end
of the vehicle it's unbelievably bouncy and uncomfortable.

If you never intend to carry a passenger you might find it OK - but forget
taking grandchildren etc away with you. (it's also very dangerous, due to
the flimsy construction - if something ran into the rear of the motorhome
it would shatter into matchwood, along with the person sitting there!)

Also watch the payload - Autosleepers are fond of using the lighter
ducatto chassis which can leave very little room for loading.

Also, bear in mind that Autosleepers have been trading on a former
reputation for quality for quite some years now. Their all fibreglass
monocoques were excellent but their bonded stuff just isn't in the same
league - Autosleepers are certainly not worth the price premium that they
appear to think they deserve. Are they still using that window, mounted on
its side, at the rear? - typical Autosleepers cost cutting! - they needed
a tall rectangular window, but wouldn't pay for one, preferring to use a
conventional window arse over tit!

Take a look at the Hymer overcabs - much better quality - no, change
that! - HUGELY better quality.


I wasn't going to go into the individual makes or ideas about pros and cons
of different layouts but now you've started I'll carry on. We did a lot of
research, decided what we wanted to be able to do then found a model that
fitted it best. These are some of my ideas about what you may want and how
to achieve it. Our over-riding thoughts with everything were ease of use.
Permanent beds. Makes the whole evening thing easy, a real must. We chose
a vehicle with overcab double bed for us and 2 fixed bunks across the back.
Big Boot. Makes getting away easy cos you simply always carry everything,
sun loungers, toys, etc, no need to load up every time. The rear 'garage'
under the bottom bunk at the back does this for us.
Front or rear facing travelling seats with seatbelts.
Separate shower compartment instead of converting the loo compartment and
having to dry the floor etc before anyone can use the loo afterwards. We
didn't get this but it's a must for next time.
Oven/Grill. We got this but it's a retrofit cos Germans live without them.
Removeable carpets.
Wind-out awning
Inverter. Then you can charge phones, gameboys, ipods etc etc without
having a christmas tree arrangement hanging out of the cigarette lighter
socket. This was a retrofit, about ?30
Probably other things I can't remember now. And yes, it's a Hymer, couldn't
stand the idea of fixing damp bits. Built in 2001 it's still got 2 years
water ingress warranty left on it. I don't know what you get with UK vans
now but a couple of years ago there weren't many with 6 years warranty.
Finally, the way the Hymer's constructed, ie no timber frame but a high
density foam sandwich, means that even if water gets in it doesn't rot.

Rgds

Andy R


Wanted a Ford and Autosleeper as that's what gave us the urge in the
first place, but on consideration and with great help from the likes
of you it seems Hymer/VW combo might be a better idea. I'd simply hate
to buy another piece of crap built to a caravan standard, rather not
have one at all but I'm really reluctant to go for a Peugeot or Fiat
as they just dont last as long as a Ford etc in general, and servicing
the darn thing readily and cheaply is a must. We had so much trouble
fining decent Volvo servicing that we would never touch Volvo
again......
Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 11:27 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Andy R
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 821
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...

I wasn't going to go into the individual makes or ideas about pros and
cons
of different layouts but now you've started I'll carry on. We did a lot
of
research, decided what we wanted to be able to do then found a model that
fitted it best. These are some of my ideas about what you may want and
how
to achieve it. Our over-riding thoughts with everything were ease of use.
Permanent beds. Makes the whole evening thing easy, a real must. We
chose
a vehicle with overcab double bed for us and 2 fixed bunks across the
back.
Big Boot. Makes getting away easy cos you simply always carry everything,
sun loungers, toys, etc, no need to load up every time. The rear 'garage'
under the bottom bunk at the back does this for us.
Front or rear facing travelling seats with seatbelts.
Separate shower compartment instead of converting the loo compartment and
having to dry the floor etc before anyone can use the loo afterwards. We
didn't get this but it's a must for next time.
Oven/Grill. We got this but it's a retrofit cos Germans live without
them.
Removeable carpets.
Wind-out awning
Inverter. Then you can charge phones, gameboys, ipods etc etc without
having a christmas tree arrangement hanging out of the cigarette lighter
socket. This was a retrofit, about ?30
Probably other things I can't remember now. And yes, it's a Hymer,
couldn't
stand the idea of fixing damp bits. Built in 2001 it's still got 2 years
water ingress warranty left on it. I don't know what you get with UK vans
now but a couple of years ago there weren't many with 6 years warranty.
Finally, the way the Hymer's constructed, ie no timber frame but a high
density foam sandwich, means that even if water gets in it doesn't rot.

Rgds

Andy R


Wanted a Ford and Autosleeper as that's what gave us the urge in the
first place, but on consideration and with great help from the likes
of you it seems Hymer/VW combo might be a better idea. I'd simply hate
to buy another piece of crap built to a caravan standard, rather not
have one at all but I'm really reluctant to go for a Peugeot or Fiat
as they just dont last as long as a Ford etc in general, and servicing
the darn thing readily and cheaply is a must. We had so much trouble
fining decent Volvo servicing that we would never touch Volvo
again......


My Hymer (B524) is built on a 2.8JTD Ducato, I don't know what other
vehicles they build on. Bearing in mind that unless you're living in it
full time you're unlikely to do more than about 5000 miles p/a don't worry
too much about servicing, it's something you rarely do. These things are
not everyday vehicles, they're too big to take to the shops etc so the
mileage clocks up slowly. When you do find a decent garage they can usually
service most makes so unless for some mad reason you want a main dealer then
this doesn't matter. You see Fiat/Peugeot delivery vans with 300000 miles
on the clock still going strong so don't worry about it too much. All
modern diesels are pretty DIY unfriendly now, probably the only reason you
think you see more old transits still running is because they're old ones
from the days before electronic engine management when anyone could get them
running.

Rgds

Andy R


  #3 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 11:55 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?

On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:27:36 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...

I wasn't going to go into the individual makes or ideas about pros and
cons
of different layouts but now you've started I'll carry on. We did a lot
of
research, decided what we wanted to be able to do then found a model that
fitted it best. These are some of my ideas about what you may want and
how
to achieve it. Our over-riding thoughts with everything were ease of use.
Permanent beds. Makes the whole evening thing easy, a real must. We
chose
a vehicle with overcab double bed for us and 2 fixed bunks across the
back.
Big Boot. Makes getting away easy cos you simply always carry everything,
sun loungers, toys, etc, no need to load up every time. The rear 'garage'
under the bottom bunk at the back does this for us.
Front or rear facing travelling seats with seatbelts.
Separate shower compartment instead of converting the loo compartment and
having to dry the floor etc before anyone can use the loo afterwards. We
didn't get this but it's a must for next time.
Oven/Grill. We got this but it's a retrofit cos Germans live without
them.
Removeable carpets.
Wind-out awning
Inverter. Then you can charge phones, gameboys, ipods etc etc without
having a christmas tree arrangement hanging out of the cigarette lighter
socket. This was a retrofit, about ?30
Probably other things I can't remember now. And yes, it's a Hymer,
couldn't
stand the idea of fixing damp bits. Built in 2001 it's still got 2 years
water ingress warranty left on it. I don't know what you get with UK vans
now but a couple of years ago there weren't many with 6 years warranty.
Finally, the way the Hymer's constructed, ie no timber frame but a high
density foam sandwich, means that even if water gets in it doesn't rot.

Rgds

Andy R


Wanted a Ford and Autosleeper as that's what gave us the urge in the
first place, but on consideration and with great help from the likes
of you it seems Hymer/VW combo might be a better idea. I'd simply hate
to buy another piece of crap built to a caravan standard, rather not
have one at all but I'm really reluctant to go for a Peugeot or Fiat
as they just dont last as long as a Ford etc in general, and servicing
the darn thing readily and cheaply is a must. We had so much trouble
fining decent Volvo servicing that we would never touch Volvo
again......


My Hymer (B524) is built on a 2.8JTD Ducato, I don't know what other
vehicles they build on. Bearing in mind that unless you're living in it
full time you're unlikely to do more than about 5000 miles p/a don't worry
too much about servicing, it's something you rarely do. These things are
not everyday vehicles, they're too big to take to the shops etc so the
mileage clocks up slowly. When you do find a decent garage they can usually
service most makes so unless for some mad reason you want a main dealer then
this doesn't matter. You see Fiat/Peugeot delivery vans with 300000 miles
on the clock still going strong so don't worry about it too much. All
modern diesels are pretty DIY unfriendly now, probably the only reason you
think you see more old transits still running is because they're old ones
from the days before electronic engine management when anyone could get them
running.


Thanks. What downsides do you see now you own a camper?
  #4 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 11:59 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Percy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?


"Andy R" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...

I wasn't going to go into the individual makes or ideas about pros and
cons
of different layouts but now you've started I'll carry on. We did a lot
of
research, decided what we wanted to be able to do then found a model that
fitted it best. These are some of my ideas about what you may want and
how
to achieve it. Our over-riding thoughts with everything were ease of
use.
Permanent beds. Makes the whole evening thing easy, a real must. We
chose
a vehicle with overcab double bed for us and 2 fixed bunks across the
back.
Big Boot. Makes getting away easy cos you simply always carry
everything,
sun loungers, toys, etc, no need to load up every time. The rear
'garage'
under the bottom bunk at the back does this for us.
Front or rear facing travelling seats with seatbelts.
Separate shower compartment instead of converting the loo compartment and
having to dry the floor etc before anyone can use the loo afterwards. We
didn't get this but it's a must for next time.
Oven/Grill. We got this but it's a retrofit cos Germans live without
them.
Removeable carpets.
Wind-out awning
Inverter. Then you can charge phones, gameboys, ipods etc etc without
having a christmas tree arrangement hanging out of the cigarette lighter
socket. This was a retrofit, about ?30
Probably other things I can't remember now. And yes, it's a Hymer,
couldn't
stand the idea of fixing damp bits. Built in 2001 it's still got 2 years
water ingress warranty left on it. I don't know what you get with UK
vans
now but a couple of years ago there weren't many with 6 years warranty.
Finally, the way the Hymer's constructed, ie no timber frame but a high
density foam sandwich, means that even if water gets in it doesn't rot.

Rgds

Andy R


Wanted a Ford and Autosleeper as that's what gave us the urge in the
first place, but on consideration and with great help from the likes
of you it seems Hymer/VW combo might be a better idea. I'd simply hate
to buy another piece of crap built to a caravan standard, rather not
have one at all but I'm really reluctant to go for a Peugeot or Fiat
as they just dont last as long as a Ford etc in general, and servicing
the darn thing readily and cheaply is a must. We had so much trouble
fining decent Volvo servicing that we would never touch Volvo
again......


My Hymer (B524) is built on a 2.8JTD Ducato, I don't know what other
vehicles they build on.



Fiat & Mercedes Sprinter.



  #5 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 12:11 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Percy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:27:36 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...

I wasn't going to go into the individual makes or ideas about pros and
cons
of different layouts but now you've started I'll carry on. We did a lot
of
research, decided what we wanted to be able to do then found a model
that
fitted it best. These are some of my ideas about what you may want and
how
to achieve it. Our over-riding thoughts with everything were ease of
use.
Permanent beds. Makes the whole evening thing easy, a real must. We
chose
a vehicle with overcab double bed for us and 2 fixed bunks across the
back.
Big Boot. Makes getting away easy cos you simply always carry
everything,
sun loungers, toys, etc, no need to load up every time. The rear
'garage'
under the bottom bunk at the back does this for us.
Front or rear facing travelling seats with seatbelts.
Separate shower compartment instead of converting the loo compartment
and
having to dry the floor etc before anyone can use the loo afterwards.
We
didn't get this but it's a must for next time.
Oven/Grill. We got this but it's a retrofit cos Germans live without
them.
Removeable carpets.
Wind-out awning
Inverter. Then you can charge phones, gameboys, ipods etc etc without
having a christmas tree arrangement hanging out of the cigarette lighter
socket. This was a retrofit, about ?30
Probably other things I can't remember now. And yes, it's a Hymer,
couldn't
stand the idea of fixing damp bits. Built in 2001 it's still got 2
years
water ingress warranty left on it. I don't know what you get with UK
vans
now but a couple of years ago there weren't many with 6 years warranty.
Finally, the way the Hymer's constructed, ie no timber frame but a high
density foam sandwich, means that even if water gets in it doesn't rot.

Rgds

Andy R


Wanted a Ford and Autosleeper as that's what gave us the urge in the
first place, but on consideration and with great help from the likes
of you it seems Hymer/VW combo might be a better idea. I'd simply hate
to buy another piece of crap built to a caravan standard, rather not
have one at all but I'm really reluctant to go for a Peugeot or Fiat
as they just dont last as long as a Ford etc in general, and servicing
the darn thing readily and cheaply is a must. We had so much trouble
fining decent Volvo servicing that we would never touch Volvo
again......


My Hymer (B524) is built on a 2.8JTD Ducato, I don't know what other
vehicles they build on. Bearing in mind that unless you're living in it
full time you're unlikely to do more than about 5000 miles p/a don't worry
too much about servicing, it's something you rarely do. These things are
not everyday vehicles, they're too big to take to the shops etc so the
mileage clocks up slowly. When you do find a decent garage they can
usually
service most makes so unless for some mad reason you want a main dealer
then
this doesn't matter. You see Fiat/Peugeot delivery vans with 300000 miles
on the clock still going strong so don't worry about it too much. All
modern diesels are pretty DIY unfriendly now, probably the only reason you
think you see more old transits still running is because they're old ones
from the days before electronic engine management when anyone could get
them
running.


Thanks. What downsides do you see now you own a camper?






The biggest downside has to be no easily useable vehicle when on site.

Contrary to popular opinion, the biggest drawback is not packing things away
in order to drive off site - rather, it's the constant need to negotiate
narrow lanes (if using CL's, etc) and the ever-present problem of parking in
busy tourist spots.

Some other disadvantages -

1/ Thieves know that a motorhome parked in town is almost certain to be
full of worthwhile goodies to steal.

2/ Although insurance is a bargain when compared with the caravan
equivalent you must bear in mind that the vehicle is treated as a single
entity. Thus, if someone forces the caravan door (which are no more
substantial than a conventional `trailer caravan door) the resulting claim
will affect your vehicle no-claim bonus. Unlike a claim for a conventional
caravan which has no effect on your car premium.

3/ windscreens - the 'A' class motorhomes utilise manufacturer specific
windscreens which are impossible to obtain immediately by Autoglass, etc.

We once had a screen damaged by a stone - and we were lucky that it didn't
shatter because it took nearly a month to obtain a replacement (at 900!)
This would, obviously, put an immediate end to your holiday. Motorhomes
built on standard chassis cabs are a better bet in that respect, and
Autoglass will usually obtain one reasonably quickly.


  #6 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 12:55 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Andy R
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 821
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:27:36 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...

My Hymer (B524) is built on a 2.8JTD Ducato, I don't know what other
vehicles they build on. Bearing in mind that unless you're living in it
full time you're unlikely to do more than about 5000 miles p/a don't worry
too much about servicing, it's something you rarely do. These things are
not everyday vehicles, they're too big to take to the shops etc so the
mileage clocks up slowly. When you do find a decent garage they can
usually
service most makes so unless for some mad reason you want a main dealer
then
this doesn't matter. You see Fiat/Peugeot delivery vans with 300000 miles
on the clock still going strong so don't worry about it too much. All
modern diesels are pretty DIY unfriendly now, probably the only reason you
think you see more old transits still running is because they're old ones
from the days before electronic engine management when anyone could get
them
running.


Thanks. What downsides do you see now you own a camper?


Another poster, Percy, has hit the nail on the head really although you can
kill two of the disadvantages with one stone if you tow a small car behind
you if going away on an extended break but doing this for short trips
increases the preparation time reducing the benefits.

To sum it up I'd say if you do a lot of shortish time trips, you're short of
time cos you work, you like easier driving and minimum 'work' to do before
and after then go for a camper. If you mainly do longer hols and time isn't
too critical then a caravan wins.

Rgds

Andy R


  #7 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 02:56 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?

On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 13:11:09 +0100, "Percy" wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:27:36 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...

I wasn't going to go into the individual makes or ideas about pros and
cons
of different layouts but now you've started I'll carry on. We did a lot
of
research, decided what we wanted to be able to do then found a model
that
fitted it best. These are some of my ideas about what you may want and
how
to achieve it. Our over-riding thoughts with everything were ease of
use.
Permanent beds. Makes the whole evening thing easy, a real must. We
chose
a vehicle with overcab double bed for us and 2 fixed bunks across the
back.
Big Boot. Makes getting away easy cos you simply always carry
everything,
sun loungers, toys, etc, no need to load up every time. The rear
'garage'
under the bottom bunk at the back does this for us.
Front or rear facing travelling seats with seatbelts.
Separate shower compartment instead of converting the loo compartment
and
having to dry the floor etc before anyone can use the loo afterwards.
We
didn't get this but it's a must for next time.
Oven/Grill. We got this but it's a retrofit cos Germans live without
them.
Removeable carpets.
Wind-out awning
Inverter. Then you can charge phones, gameboys, ipods etc etc without
having a christmas tree arrangement hanging out of the cigarette lighter
socket. This was a retrofit, about ?30
Probably other things I can't remember now. And yes, it's a Hymer,
couldn't
stand the idea of fixing damp bits. Built in 2001 it's still got 2
years
water ingress warranty left on it. I don't know what you get with UK
vans
now but a couple of years ago there weren't many with 6 years warranty.
Finally, the way the Hymer's constructed, ie no timber frame but a high
density foam sandwich, means that even if water gets in it doesn't rot.

Rgds

Andy R


Wanted a Ford and Autosleeper as that's what gave us the urge in the
first place, but on consideration and with great help from the likes
of you it seems Hymer/VW combo might be a better idea. I'd simply hate
to buy another piece of crap built to a caravan standard, rather not
have one at all but I'm really reluctant to go for a Peugeot or Fiat
as they just dont last as long as a Ford etc in general, and servicing
the darn thing readily and cheaply is a must. We had so much trouble
fining decent Volvo servicing that we would never touch Volvo
again......

My Hymer (B524) is built on a 2.8JTD Ducato, I don't know what other
vehicles they build on. Bearing in mind that unless you're living in it
full time you're unlikely to do more than about 5000 miles p/a don't worry
too much about servicing, it's something you rarely do. These things are
not everyday vehicles, they're too big to take to the shops etc so the
mileage clocks up slowly. When you do find a decent garage they can
usually
service most makes so unless for some mad reason you want a main dealer
then
this doesn't matter. You see Fiat/Peugeot delivery vans with 300000 miles
on the clock still going strong so don't worry about it too much. All
modern diesels are pretty DIY unfriendly now, probably the only reason you
think you see more old transits still running is because they're old ones
from the days before electronic engine management when anyone could get
them
running.


Thanks. What downsides do you see now you own a camper?






The biggest downside has to be no easily useable vehicle when on site.


We go to sites for walks and cycling really so this would not be too
much of a problem, but it would be a little.

Contrary to popular opinion, the biggest drawback is not packing things away
in order to drive off site - rather, it's the constant need to negotiate
narrow lanes (if using CL's, etc) and the ever-present problem of parking in
busy tourist spots.


We would be using CLs a lot and avoiding the madding crowds like the
plague so I reckon not too bad again. We envisage getting a coachbuilt
2 berth with lutoncab for the occasional kids. So I reckon not too
drastic for the country lanes?


Some other disadvantages -

1/ Thieves know that a motorhome parked in town is almost certain to be
full of worthwhile goodies to steal.

2/ Although insurance is a bargain when compared with the caravan
equivalent you must bear in mind that the vehicle is treated as a single
entity. Thus, if someone forces the caravan door (which are no more
substantial than a conventional `trailer caravan door) the resulting claim
will affect your vehicle no-claim bonus. Unlike a claim for a conventional
caravan which has no effect on your car premium.


Good point.

3/ windscreens - the 'A' class motorhomes utilise manufacturer specific
windscreens which are impossible to obtain immediately by Autoglass, etc.

We once had a screen damaged by a stone - and we were lucky that it didn't
shatter because it took nearly a month to obtain a replacement (at ?900!)
This would, obviously, put an immediate end to your holiday. Motorhomes
built on standard chassis cabs are a better bet in that respect, and
Autoglass will usually obtain one reasonably quickly.


Another good point.

Thanks.
  #8 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 02:57 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Gary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?

On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 13:55:12 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:27:36 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...
My Hymer (B524) is built on a 2.8JTD Ducato, I don't know what other
vehicles they build on. Bearing in mind that unless you're living in it
full time you're unlikely to do more than about 5000 miles p/a don't worry
too much about servicing, it's something you rarely do. These things are
not everyday vehicles, they're too big to take to the shops etc so the
mileage clocks up slowly. When you do find a decent garage they can
usually
service most makes so unless for some mad reason you want a main dealer
then
this doesn't matter. You see Fiat/Peugeot delivery vans with 300000 miles
on the clock still going strong so don't worry about it too much. All
modern diesels are pretty DIY unfriendly now, probably the only reason you
think you see more old transits still running is because they're old ones
from the days before electronic engine management when anyone could get
them
running.


Thanks. What downsides do you see now you own a camper?


Another poster, Percy, has hit the nail on the head really although you can
kill two of the disadvantages with one stone if you tow a small car behind
you if going away on an extended break but doing this for short trips
increases the preparation time reducing the benefits.

To sum it up I'd say if you do a lot of shortish time trips, you're short of
time cos you work, you like easier driving and minimum 'work' to do before
and after then go for a camper. If you mainly do longer hols and time isn't
too critical then a caravan wins.


Thanks. It will be the snatched shorties sadly, the main reason we
want one. We have a caravan and for that reason it never leaves the
site we first stayed at..lol



  #9 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 04:50 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Percy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 18
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 13:11:09 +0100, "Percy" wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:27:36 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...

I wasn't going to go into the individual makes or ideas about pros and
cons
of different layouts but now you've started I'll carry on. We did a
lot
of
research, decided what we wanted to be able to do then found a model
that
fitted it best. These are some of my ideas about what you may want
and
how
to achieve it. Our over-riding thoughts with everything were ease of
use.
Permanent beds. Makes the whole evening thing easy, a real must. We
chose
a vehicle with overcab double bed for us and 2 fixed bunks across the
back.
Big Boot. Makes getting away easy cos you simply always carry
everything,
sun loungers, toys, etc, no need to load up every time. The rear
'garage'
under the bottom bunk at the back does this for us.
Front or rear facing travelling seats with seatbelts.
Separate shower compartment instead of converting the loo compartment
and
having to dry the floor etc before anyone can use the loo afterwards.
We
didn't get this but it's a must for next time.
Oven/Grill. We got this but it's a retrofit cos Germans live without
them.
Removeable carpets.
Wind-out awning
Inverter. Then you can charge phones, gameboys, ipods etc etc without
having a christmas tree arrangement hanging out of the cigarette
lighter
socket. This was a retrofit, about ?30
Probably other things I can't remember now. And yes, it's a Hymer,
couldn't
stand the idea of fixing damp bits. Built in 2001 it's still got 2
years
water ingress warranty left on it. I don't know what you get with UK
vans
now but a couple of years ago there weren't many with 6 years
warranty.
Finally, the way the Hymer's constructed, ie no timber frame but a
high
density foam sandwich, means that even if water gets in it doesn't
rot.

Rgds

Andy R


Wanted a Ford and Autosleeper as that's what gave us the urge in the
first place, but on consideration and with great help from the likes
of you it seems Hymer/VW combo might be a better idea. I'd simply hate
to buy another piece of crap built to a caravan standard, rather not
have one at all but I'm really reluctant to go for a Peugeot or Fiat
as they just dont last as long as a Ford etc in general, and servicing
the darn thing readily and cheaply is a must. We had so much trouble
fining decent Volvo servicing that we would never touch Volvo
again......

My Hymer (B524) is built on a 2.8JTD Ducato, I don't know what other
vehicles they build on. Bearing in mind that unless you're living in it
full time you're unlikely to do more than about 5000 miles p/a don't
worry
too much about servicing, it's something you rarely do. These things
are
not everyday vehicles, they're too big to take to the shops etc so the
mileage clocks up slowly. When you do find a decent garage they can
usually
service most makes so unless for some mad reason you want a main dealer
then
this doesn't matter. You see Fiat/Peugeot delivery vans with 300000
miles
on the clock still going strong so don't worry about it too much. All
modern diesels are pretty DIY unfriendly now, probably the only reason
you
think you see more old transits still running is because they're old
ones
from the days before electronic engine management when anyone could get
them
running.

Thanks. What downsides do you see now you own a camper?






The biggest downside has to be no easily useable vehicle when on site.


We go to sites for walks and cycling really so this would not be too
much of a problem, but it would be a little.

Contrary to popular opinion, the biggest drawback is not packing things
away
in order to drive off site - rather, it's the constant need to negotiate
narrow lanes (if using CL's, etc) and the ever-present problem of parking
in
busy tourist spots.


We would be using CLs a lot and avoiding the madding crowds like the
plague so I reckon not too bad again. We envisage getting a coachbuilt
2 berth with lutoncab for the occasional kids. So I reckon not too
drastic for the country lanes?


Some other disadvantages -

1/ Thieves know that a motorhome parked in town is almost certain to be
full of worthwhile goodies to steal.

2/ Although insurance is a bargain when compared with the caravan
equivalent you must bear in mind that the vehicle is treated as a single
entity. Thus, if someone forces the caravan door (which are no more
substantial than a conventional `trailer caravan door) the resulting claim
will affect your vehicle no-claim bonus. Unlike a claim for a
conventional
caravan which has no effect on your car premium.


Good point.

3/ windscreens - the 'A' class motorhomes utilise manufacturer specific
windscreens which are impossible to obtain immediately by Autoglass, etc.

We once had a screen damaged by a stone - and we were lucky that it didn't
shatter because it took nearly a month to obtain a replacement (at ?900!)
This would, obviously, put an immediate end to your holiday. Motorhomes
built on standard chassis cabs are a better bet in that respect, and
Autoglass will usually obtain one reasonably quickly.


Another good point.

Thanks.




You're welcome.

One final point - regarding the inherent paradox of Motorhoming.....

Virtually every advertisement for them majors heavily on 'Freedom' - freedom
to go where you want, freedom to stay where you will, freedom of the open
road.

However, try driving more than, say, 4,000 miles per year in your motorhome,
and watch the depreciation rocket!

Ask any dealer, they reckon on an 3,000 - 4,000 miles per year as 'average
use - above that figure they start making huge reductions on your future
part exchange price.

You can own a fully self-contained leisure vehicle - but if you start to use
it properly you will lose many thousands of pounds. Crazy, eh?

Oh, and parking overnight in secluded lay-by's can seem a terrific idea -
when the afternoon sun is shining, that is. The reality is sleepless
nights, listening to every vehicle pulling up, and wondering if you are
about to be broken into! Always stay on a recognised site - no matter how
humble, you'll sleep much more easily.



  #10 (permalink)  
Old July 5th 05, 08:33 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning,uk.rec.motorcaravans
Malcolm
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default MotorHome questions. Got one?

On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 17:50:45 +0100, "Percy" wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 13:11:09 +0100, "Percy" wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 12:27:36 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Gary" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 5 Jul 2005 08:54:07 +0100, "Andy R"
wrote:


"Percy" wrote in message
...

"Gary" wrote in message
...

I wasn't going to go into the individual makes or ideas about pros and
cons
of different layouts but now you've started I'll carry on. We did a
lot
of
research, decided what we wanted to be able to do then found a model
that
fitted it best. These are some of my ideas about what you may want
and
how
to achieve it. Our over-riding thoughts with everything were ease of
use.
Permanent beds. Makes the whole evening thing easy, a real must. We
chose
a vehicle with overcab double bed for us and 2 fixed bunks across the
back.
Big Boot. Makes getting away easy cos you simply always carry
everything,
sun loungers, toys, etc, no need to load up every time. The rear
'garage'
under the bottom bunk at the back does this for us.
Front or rear facing travelling seats with seatbelts.
Separate shower compartment instead of converting the loo compartment
and
having to dry the floor etc before anyone can use the loo afterwards.
We
didn't get this but it's a must for next time.
Oven/Grill. We got this but it's a retrofit cos Germans live without
them.
Removeable carpets.
Wind-out awning
Inverter. Then you can charge phones, gameboys, ipods etc etc without
having a christmas tree arrangement hanging out of the cigarette
lighter
socket. This was a retrofit, about ?30
Probably other things I can't remember now. And yes, it's a Hymer,
couldn't
stand the idea of fixing damp bits. Built in 2001 it's still got 2
years
water ingress warranty left on it. I don't know what you get with UK
vans
now but a couple of years ago there weren't many with 6 years
warranty.
Finally, the way the Hymer's constructed, ie no timber frame but a
high
density foam sandwich, means that even if water gets in it doesn't
rot.

Rgds

Andy R


Wanted a Ford and Autosleeper as that's what gave us the urge in the
first place, but on consideration and with great help from the likes
of you it seems Hymer/VW combo might be a better idea. I'd simply hate
to buy another piece of crap built to a caravan standard, rather not
have one at all but I'm really reluctant to go for a Peugeot or Fiat
as they just dont last as long as a Ford etc in general, and servicing
the darn thing readily and cheaply is a must. We had so much trouble
fining decent Volvo servicing that we would never touch Volvo
again......

My Hymer (B524) is built on a 2.8JTD Ducato, I don't know what other
vehicles they build on. Bearing in mind that unless you're living in it
full time you're unlikely to do more than about 5000 miles p/a don't
worry
too much about servicing, it's something you rarely do. These things
are
not everyday vehicles, they're too big to take to the shops etc so the
mileage clocks up slowly. When you do find a decent garage they can
usually
service most makes so unless for some mad reason you want a main dealer
then
this doesn't matter. You see Fiat/Peugeot delivery vans with 300000
miles
on the clock still going strong so don't worry about it too much. All
modern diesels are pretty DIY unfriendly now, probably the only reason
you
think you see more old transits still running is because they're old
ones
from the days before electronic engine management when anyone could get
them
running.

Thanks. What downsides do you see now you own a camper?





The biggest downside has to be no easily useable vehicle when on site.


We go to sites for walks and cycling really so this would not be too
much of a problem, but it would be a little.

Contrary to popular opinion, the biggest drawback is not packing things
away
in order to drive off site - rather, it's the constant need to negotiate
narrow lanes (if using CL's, etc) and the ever-present problem of parking
in
busy tourist spots.


We would be using CLs a lot and avoiding the madding crowds like the
plague so I reckon not too bad again. We envisage getting a coachbuilt
2 berth with lutoncab for the occasional kids. So I reckon not too
drastic for the country lanes?


Some other disadvantages -

1/ Thieves know that a motorhome parked in town is almost certain to be
full of worthwhile goodies to steal.

2/ Although insurance is a bargain when compared with the caravan
equivalent you must bear in mind that the vehicle is treated as a single
entity. Thus, if someone forces the caravan door (which are no more
substantial than a conventional `trailer caravan door) the resulting claim
will affect your vehicle no-claim bonus. Unlike a claim for a
conventional
caravan which has no effect on your car premium.


Good point.

3/ windscreens - the 'A' class motorhomes utilise manufacturer specific
windscreens which are impossible to obtain immediately by Autoglass, etc.

We once had a screen damaged by a stone - and we were lucky that it didn't
shatter because it took nearly a month to obtain a replacement (at ?900!)
This would, obviously, put an immediate end to your holiday. Motorhomes
built on standard chassis cabs are a better bet in that respect, and
Autoglass will usually obtain one reasonably quickly.


Another good point.

Thanks.




You're welcome.

One final point - regarding the inherent paradox of Motorhoming.....

Virtually every advertisement for them majors heavily on 'Freedom' - freedom
to go where you want, freedom to stay where you will, freedom of the open
road.

However, try driving more than, say, 4,000 miles per year in your motorhome,
and watch the depreciation rocket!

Ask any dealer, they reckon on an 3,000 - 4,000 miles per year as 'average
use - above that figure they start making huge reductions on your future
part exchange price.

You can own a fully self-contained leisure vehicle - but if you start to use
it properly you will lose many thousands of pounds. Crazy, eh?


Sure is, not really a problem if you plan to own the van for many
years. We plan on keeping ours for at least ten years, its our country
cottage we could never get until the brats have flown the coop and by
then we'd be too old to want to use it anyway I guess so it allows us
to have all the freedom etc now and sod the cost.

Oh, and parking overnight in secluded lay-by's can seem a terrific idea -
when the afternoon sun is shining, that is. The reality is sleepless
nights, listening to every vehicle pulling up, and wondering if you are
about to be broken into! Always stay on a recognised site - no matter how
humble, you'll sleep much more easily.


True but a decent set of deadlocks and alarm and secure lockers should
allay most fears, and a strategically placed club or two should deal
with the rest. You could never be 100% secure but if you let it worry
you too much you'll lose a lot of the freedom it offers.

Dead locks on all doors are really good because you wont get many
people wanting to climb in and out of windows, although it wont stop
them trying I guess.

Stun gun anyone?
 



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT. The time now is 04:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC6
Copyright 2004-2019 Caravan Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.