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UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

Which stabiliser?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old February 14th 08, 05:42 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Sam Farrell[_3_]
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Posts: 4
Default Which stabiliser?

Thinking of having a stabiliser fitted, which is best the ALKO or the
Snakemaster ?

Sam


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old February 14th 08, 06:47 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
David Klyne
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Posts: 61
Default Which stabiliser?



"Sam Farrell" wrote in message
...
Thinking of having a stabiliser fitted, which is best the ALKO or the
Snakemaster ?

Sam

The hitch type are a lot more convenient.

David - Milton Keynes
www.caravantravels.co.uk


  #3 (permalink)  
Old February 14th 08, 07:27 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
[email protected]
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Posts: 9
Default Which stabiliser?

On Thu, 14 Feb 2008 18:42:16 -0000, "Sam Farrell"
wrote:

Thinking of having a stabiliser fitted, which is best the ALKO or the
Snakemaster ?

Sam

Hi sam
Alko 3004 everytime. From my experience this is the best performing
stabiliser I have used. Having said that, correct loading and driving
with the 'van is also important.

Gary
4x4RR, Carlight Countess 15/2 both 1994
  #4 (permalink)  
Old February 14th 08, 09:54 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
[email protected] home
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Posts: 589
Default Which stabiliser?


"Sam Farrell" wrote in message
...
Thinking of having a stabiliser fitted, which is best the ALKO or the
Snakemaster ?

Sam

Definatelt not the snakemaster. If you want a blade type, get a Driver,
which is a direct copy of the Scott.

The AlKo is a good stabiliser, but expensive.

Cheers

D


  #5 (permalink)  
Old February 15th 08, 07:38 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
hugh
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Posts: 1,616
Default Which stabiliser?

In message , David Klyne
writes


"Sam Farrell" wrote in message
...
Thinking of having a stabiliser fitted, which is best the ALKO or the
Snakemaster ?

Sam

The hitch type are a lot more convenient.

David - Milton Keynes
www.caravantravels.co.uk


Not if you've got a Land Rover with the spare wheel on the rear door it
isn't!!!!.

Picked up my new van today (Lunar Clubman Es and had to use a trolley
jack to lift the hitch off as an alternative to taking off the (heavy)
spare wheel.
--
hugh
Reply to address is valid at the time of posting
  #6 (permalink)  
Old February 15th 08, 08:44 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Geoff Lane[_2_]
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Posts: 178
Default Which stabiliser?

hugh ] wrote in
:

The hitch type are a lot more convenient.

David - Milton Keynes
www.caravantravels.co.uk


Not if you've got a Land Rover with the spare wheel on the rear door it
isn't!!!!.

Picked up my new van today (Lunar Clubman Es and had to use a trolley
jack to lift the hitch off as an alternative to taking off the (heavy)
spare wheel.


I had the same trouble with my Pajero and an Alko 3004. One way around it
is to carefully back up to the 'van with the back door of the towcar
open. That way, the stabiliser handle doesn't foul the spare wheel. When
you've hitched up but before you raise the jockey wheel all the way,
close the back door. Unhitching is basically the reverse procedure.

Alternatively, a 50mm spacer between the towing bracket and the towball
can often give enough clearance to let you hitch up without opening the
door (provided the outfit's in a straight line).

Other than that, you could always fork out twenty-five quid for Alko's
4x4 kludge (although just why we have to pay for a defect in their goods
beats me), or remove the handle securing screw(s) and use the handle the
same way as you're meant to use the kludge. (If you do either, note that
you need to remove the handle before driving off or you stand a good
chance of losing it!)

HTH,

--
Geoff
  #7 (permalink)  
Old February 15th 08, 09:47 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
[email protected] home
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Posts: 589
Default Which stabiliser?



Alternatively, a 50mm spacer between the towing bracket and the towball
can often give enough clearance to let you hitch up without opening the
door (provided the outfit's in a straight line).

You can't use a 50mm spacer if the car is built after 1998, unless the
towbar is homologated with it.

Cheers

D


  #8 (permalink)  
Old February 16th 08, 01:27 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Neil
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Posts: 468
Default Which stabiliser?

On Fri, 15 Feb 2008 20:38:28 +0000, hugh ] wrote:

In message , David Klyne
writes


"Sam Farrell" wrote in message
...
Thinking of having a stabiliser fitted, which is best the ALKO or the
Snakemaster ?

Sam

The hitch type are a lot more convenient.

David - Milton Keynes
www.caravantravels.co.uk


Not if you've got a Land Rover with the spare wheel on the rear door it
isn't!!!!.

Picked up my new van today (Lunar Clubman Es and had to use a trolley
jack to lift the hitch off as an alternative to taking off the (heavy)
spare wheel.


Hugh,

IIRC you drive a 90 don't you? Have you always used a stabiliser when
towing your caravans?

I only ask, as I've never used any stabiliser on either of the 2
Landrover 90's I've owned. I kind of considered it unnecessary when
the tow hitch is so close to the rear axle, as it is on a 90, and
wondered if you'd ever tried towing without one.

Neil.

(Reply via NG please)
  #9 (permalink)  
Old February 16th 08, 06:38 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Geoff Lane[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 178
Default Which stabiliser?

"[email protected] home" wrote in news:1Eotj.468$ay3.70
@newsfe5-win.ntli.net:

Alternatively, a 50mm spacer between the towing bracket and the towball
can often give enough clearance to let you hitch up without opening the
door (provided the outfit's in a straight line).

You can't use a 50mm spacer if the car is built after 1998, unless the
towbar is homologated with it.


Not entirely true. You can't do it with a type-approved vehicle. However,
most vehicles imported from outside the EU are approved on a single-vehicle
basis and so are not restrained by type-approval legislation. Basically,
for those vehicles, you can fit what you want provided you don't contravene
the Construction and Use regs or end up with a dangerous vehicle.

That said, I suspect that the OP's Landy might be UK-spec, and so your
point is entirely valid. Thanks for correcting my ommission.

--
Geoff
  #10 (permalink)  
Old February 16th 08, 10:05 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Dougal
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Posts: 91
Default Which stabiliser?

Geoff Lane wrote:

"[email protected] home" wrote in news:1Eotj.468$ay3.70
@newsfe5-win.ntli.net:


Alternatively, a 50mm spacer between the towing bracket and the towball
can often give enough clearance to let you hitch up without opening the
door (provided the outfit's in a straight line).


You can't use a 50mm spacer if the car is built after 1998, unless the
towbar is homologated with it.



Not entirely true. You can't do it with a type-approved vehicle. However,
most vehicles imported from outside the EU are approved on a single-vehicle
basis and so are not restrained by type-approval legislation. Basically,
for those vehicles, you can fit what you want provided you don't contravene
the Construction and Use regs or end up with a dangerous vehicle.

That said, I suspect that the OP's Landy might be UK-spec, and so your
point is entirely valid. Thanks for correcting my ommission.


.... and some of the Land Rover brackets are certified with a 50 mm
spacer (and 75 mm drop plate, too).

The silly thing about this directive, particularly when applied to Land
Rovers, is that the vehicles to which the directive applies and their
commercial siblings use the same chassis, suspension, tow brackets etc.
yet only the non-commercial ones need to keep to the letter of the
directive.

Stabiliser on a Land Rover - no, I've never used one nor felt the need
to do so.
 



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