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UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

New tyres



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old August 11th 09, 04:47 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Tunku[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default New tyres

The tyres on the front of my '98 Mondeo 1.8i are at almost the legal
minimum, rears have almost new treads. I need new ones on the front. Should
I swap the older rears to the front and have the new tyres on the rear?
I had a scary moment today coming home with the 'van, Went into a corner a
bit hot and started skidding wide, maximum understeer. I reckon it was the
dab of brakes putting the 'van brakes on that helped get it all under
control.

--
The above post may contain traces of irony
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old August 11th 09, 05:09 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
David
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Posts: 594
Default New tyres



"Tunku" wrote --
The above post may contain traces of irony


I prefer the best tyres on the front of my car for good grip steering and
drive, but safety people say to have best tyres on rear for safer braking.
Take your pick.

--
Regards,
David

FREESAT HD as it is now it is a joke.

  #3 (permalink)  
Old August 11th 09, 06:03 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Roger Mills
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 418
Default New tyres

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
David wrote:

"Tunku" wrote --
The above post may contain traces of irony


I prefer the best tyres on the front of my car for good grip steering
and drive, but safety people say to have best tyres on rear for safer
braking. Take your pick.


It depends what you mean by "safer braking". Due to weight transfer during
heavy braking, most of the braking is done by the front wheels - so *they*
need good tyres for maximum grip. It's certainly not a good idea to lock the
back wheels - which will lead to loss of directional control or even a
spin - but with decent anti-lock systems on modern cars, that's not too
likely.

Assuming that the Mondeo is FWD (is it?) - I'd definitely put the new tyres
on the front.
--
Cheers,
Roger
______
Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!


  #4 (permalink)  
Old August 11th 09, 06:10 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 594
Default New tyres



"Roger Mills" wrote in message
...

It depends what you mean by "safer braking".


The people that say put best on rear will have to answer that.
I think they might say to prevent the whole car swinging round at the rear.
As I said I think on my FWD I need the best because of the work the front
have to do.

--
Regards,
David

FREESAT HD as it is now it is a joke.

  #5 (permalink)  
Old August 12th 09, 09:24 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Andy R
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 821
Default New tyres


"Tunku" wrote in message
...
The tyres on the front of my '98 Mondeo 1.8i are at almost the legal
minimum, rears have almost new treads. I need new ones on the front.
Should
I swap the older rears to the front and have the new tyres on the rear?
I had a scary moment today coming home with the 'van, Went into a corner a
bit hot and started skidding wide, maximum understeer. I reckon it was the
dab of brakes putting the 'van brakes on that helped get it all under
control.


From
http://www.conti-online.com/generato..._tyres_en.html

As a general rule we recommend that when your tyres need replacing, put the
new tyres on the rear of the vehicle. This applies to both front and rear
wheel drive cars, with increased safety being the main reason. Particularly
in the wet, it has been shown that with partly worn tyres fitted to the
rear, their reduced water dispersal ability leads to a greater chance of
over-steer and loss of control. Used tyres are also more prone to punctures
and it has been established that rear deflations are more likely to cause
loss of control than front deflations.

Rgds

Andy R


  #6 (permalink)  
Old August 12th 09, 11:33 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Roger Mills
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 418
Default New tyres

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Andy R wrote:

From
http://www.conti-online.com/generato..._tyres_en.html

As a general rule we recommend that when your tyres need replacing,
put the new tyres on the rear of the vehicle. This applies to both
front and rear wheel drive cars, with increased safety being the main
reason. Particularly in the wet, it has been shown that with partly
worn tyres fitted to the rear, their reduced water dispersal ability
leads to a greater chance of over-steer and loss of control. Used
tyres are also more prone to punctures and it has been established
that rear deflations are more likely to cause loss of control than
front deflations.


Who am I to argue with a tyre manufacturer?!

Nevertheless, I *will* put the counter argument that worn tyres on the front
are more likely to cause understeer and - worse still - aquaplaning under
wet conditions, each resulting in loss of directional control.

Clearly *no* tyres - front *or* back - should be used when they're
sufficiently worn to cause these sorts of problems - and should be replaced
*before* the tread is worn down to the legal minimum.
--
Cheers,
Roger
______
Email address maintained for newsgroup use only, and not regularly
monitored.. Messages sent to it may not be read for several weeks.
PLEASE REPLY TO NEWSGROUP!


  #7 (permalink)  
Old August 12th 09, 04:35 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
smiler
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 55
Default New tyres


"Andy R" wrote in message
...

"Tunku" wrote in message
...
The tyres on the front of my '98 Mondeo 1.8i are at almost the legal
minimum, rears have almost new treads. I need new ones on the front.
Should
I swap the older rears to the front and have the new tyres on the rear?
I had a scary moment today coming home with the 'van, Went into a corner
a
bit hot and started skidding wide, maximum understeer. I reckon it was
the
dab of brakes putting the 'van brakes on that helped get it all under
control.


From
http://www.conti-online.com/generato..._tyres_en.html

As a general rule we recommend that when your tyres need replacing, put
the new tyres on the rear of the vehicle. This applies to both front and
rear wheel drive cars, with increased safety being the main reason.
Particularly in the wet, it has been shown that with partly worn tyres
fitted to the rear, their reduced water dispersal ability leads to a
greater chance of over-steer and loss of control. Used tyres are also more
prone to punctures and it has been established that rear deflations are
more likely to cause loss of control than front deflations.

Rgds

Andy R

When I queried why my dealer insisted on putting new tyres on the rear he
said that it was a condition of purchase. He then showed me a convincing
Michelin video

Smiler


  #8 (permalink)  
Old August 12th 09, 09:29 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Harry Bloomfield[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 278
Default New tyres

Roger Mills presented the following explanation :
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Andy R wrote:

From
http://www.conti-online.com/generato..._tyres_en.html

As a general rule we recommend that when your tyres need replacing,
put the new tyres on the rear of the vehicle. This applies to both
front and rear wheel drive cars, with increased safety being the main
reason. Particularly in the wet, it has been shown that with partly
worn tyres fitted to the rear, their reduced water dispersal ability
leads to a greater chance of over-steer and loss of control. Used
tyres are also more prone to punctures and it has been established
that rear deflations are more likely to cause loss of control than
front deflations.


Who am I to argue with a tyre manufacturer?!

Nevertheless, I *will* put the counter argument that worn tyres on the front
are more likely to cause understeer and - worse still - aquaplaning under wet
conditions, each resulting in loss of directional control.

Clearly *no* tyres - front *or* back - should be used when they're
sufficiently worn to cause these sorts of problems - and should be replaced
*before* the tread is worn down to the legal minimum.


Hmmm...

I have always found a tyre blow out on the rear much more controllable
than one blown out on the front.

Anyone agree?

--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk


  #9 (permalink)  
Old August 12th 09, 09:43 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
DieSea
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 508
Default New tyres


"Harry Bloomfield" wrote in message
k...
Roger Mills presented the following explanation :
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Andy R wrote:

From
http://www.conti-online.com/generato..._tyres_en.html

As a general rule we recommend that when your tyres need replacing,
put the new tyres on the rear of the vehicle. This applies to both
front and rear wheel drive cars, with increased safety being the main
reason. Particularly in the wet, it has been shown that with partly
worn tyres fitted to the rear, their reduced water dispersal ability
leads to a greater chance of over-steer and loss of control. Used
tyres are also more prone to punctures and it has been established
that rear deflations are more likely to cause loss of control than
front deflations.


Who am I to argue with a tyre manufacturer?!

Nevertheless, I *will* put the counter argument that worn tyres on the front
are more likely to cause understeer and - worse still - aquaplaning under wet
conditions, each resulting in loss of directional control.

Clearly *no* tyres - front *or* back - should be used when they're sufficiently
worn to cause these sorts of problems - and should be replaced *before* the
tread is worn down to the legal minimum.


Hmmm...

I have always found a tyre blow out on the rear much more controllable than one
blown out on the front.

Anyone agree?

--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
http://www.ukradioamateur.co.uk



Never had one

Don't ever want one

DieSea


  #10 (permalink)  
Old August 12th 09, 10:27 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Tunku[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default New tyres

"Roger Mills" wrote in
:

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Andy R wrote:

From
http://www.conti-

online.com/generator/www/uk/en/continental/tyres_for_
life/themes/tyre_information/replacing_tyres_en.html

As a general rule we recommend that when your tyres need replacing,
put the new tyres on the rear of the vehicle. This applies to both
front and rear wheel drive cars, with increased safety being the main
reason. Particularly in the wet, it has been shown that with partly
worn tyres fitted to the rear, their reduced water dispersal ability
leads to a greater chance of over-steer and loss of control. Used
tyres are also more prone to punctures and it has been established
that rear deflations are more likely to cause loss of control than
front deflations.


Who am I to argue with a tyre manufacturer?!

Nevertheless, I *will* put the counter argument that worn tyres on the
front are more likely to cause understeer and - worse still -
aquaplaning under wet conditions, each resulting in loss of
directional control.

Clearly *no* tyres - front *or* back - should be used when they're
sufficiently worn to cause these sorts of problems - and should be
replaced *before* the tread is worn down to the legal minimum.


Before I bought a caravan, I was always a firm believer in new tyres on
the back. I've had several front wheel drive cars and rear wheel drive
cars. I have always had oversteer in the wet with minimal tread on the
rear. Having a caravan on the back has changed the balance of the car,
causing it to understeer, presumably the extra weight pushing the car
until the trailer brake kicks in. The answer is to have new tyres all
round and go into unknown corners at a lower speed, especially in the
wet.

--
 



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