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UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

Fridge fan Suck or blow ?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 10:59 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Tim Pace
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 59
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?

I fitted 2 12v fans to my last van and they were amazing the fridge was
fantastic in very hot weather with them on, with them off it struggled big
time. We have different van now and I have not fitted them but after this
weekend the fridge struggled a bit so b4 I go to France in 3 weeks I am
fitting them again. Last time I fitted them ( the small 12v computer fans) I
deliberated on 1 or 2 fans I chose 2. I mounted them on the inside of the
grill and had them blowing colder air in after much thought as I considered
if to turn them around and have them suck warm air out. So what do you rekon
? suck or blow ? 1or 2 fans ? 2 was superb who has 1 fan is it ok ?
are you a suck or blow fan !!
Tim


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  #2 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 11:16 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Andy R
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 71
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?


"Tim Pace" wrote in message
...
I fitted 2 12v fans to my last van and they were amazing the fridge was
fantastic in very hot weather with them on, with them off it struggled big
time. We have different van now and I have not fitted them but after this
weekend the fridge struggled a bit so b4 I go to France in 3 weeks I am
fitting them again. Last time I fitted them ( the small 12v computer fans)

I
deliberated on 1 or 2 fans I chose 2. I mounted them on the inside of the
grill and had them blowing colder air in after much thought as I

considered
if to turn them around and have them suck warm air out. So what do you

rekon
? suck or blow ? 1or 2 fans ? 2 was superb who has 1 fan is it ok ?
are you a suck or blow fan !!


I would have thought the best thing is to assist the natural convection
currents so if you put the fans at the top then suck and if at the bottom
blow.

Rgds

Andy R


  #3 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 01:07 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Mike Williams
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 56
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?

"Bailey" wrote in message
...
I would like to know how you did this, do you have to cut the interior of
the fridge or what ??....can you tell me exactly how you go about fitting

a
fan please.


First you have to fit a 12v DC supply lead from your normal DC supply panel
to somewhere near the back of the fridge (you can't use the existing 12v
supply that is already on the fridge, because it is a switched supply that
is only "live" while the engine is running). If you have an arrangement
similar to a motor home which includes a "Car Battery or Leisure Battery"
switch then make sure that you run the supply from a point that is supplied
whether you are switched to the main or leisure battery. Also, make sure
that the point you connect to is supplied via the existing fuse points.
Fitting this lead is the difficult bit, because you will almost certainly
have to temporarily remove one or two things to enable you to get at the
area.

Once you have done that the rest is easy. Personally I would strap one fan
(or maybe two) to the *inside* of the top external fridge grill, positioned
so that they "blow" to the outside, and I would fit a further fan on the
fridge itself, close to the little heat exchanger fins (near the top of the
mess of fridge pipes) and positioned so that it pulls air across the fins.

These little "12 volt computer type" fans typically pull about 150
milliamps, so three of them will pull about half an amp (about the same as a
single car sidelight bulb). It isn't a great deal, but it nevertheless
represents energy that you won't want to waste unless you actually need to
so. Therefore, you should also fit a little switch to enable you to switch
the things on and off, and preferably also a thermal switch set such that
the fans do not come on until the ambient temperature rises above a certain
value (somewhere around 20 degrees centigrade).

Incidentally, I haven't noticed a problem myself in the kind of temperatures
we have in England at the moment (up to about 80 degrees), even though my
fridge is very old. But then maybe the OP is talking about much higher
ambient temperatures than that, or maybe his fridge is in a very confined
space with very little "air space" at the back, or perhaps it has faulty
insulation. Does everybody have problems with fridges failing to run cold
enough?

Mike



  #4 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 01:10 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Paul
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 54
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?



I would like to know how you did this, do you have to cut the interior of
the fridge or what ??....can you tell me exactly how you go about fitting

a
fan please.
Thanks,
Bailey.


I have an external 12v supply near the fridge grills outside so got a
computer fan, made some hooks to hook on the grill outside and plug it in.

My Thetford fridge is a bit tight on space inside the top grill. You can
get little fan kits including thermostats to mount inside the top fridge
grill.

Further to the suck or blow debate, if you mounted the fan in the bottom
grill and sucked, the danger is all the extra dust and crap being directly
sucked in and distributed inside your van and maybe blow the flame out?

Paul


  #5 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 02:51 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
bowtiejim
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 138
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?


"Mike Williams" wrote in message
...
"Bailey" wrote in message
...
I would like to know how you did this, do you have to cut the interior

of
the fridge or what ??....can you tell me exactly how you go about

fitting
a
fan please.


First you have to fit a 12v DC supply lead from your normal DC supply

panel
to somewhere near the back of the fridge (you can't use the existing 12v
supply that is already on the fridge, because it is a switched supply that
is only "live" while the engine is running). If you have an arrangement
similar to a motor home which includes a "Car Battery or Leisure Battery"
switch then make sure that you run the supply from a point that is

supplied
whether you are switched to the main or leisure battery. Also, make sure
that the point you connect to is supplied via the existing fuse points.
Fitting this lead is the difficult bit, because you will almost certainly
have to temporarily remove one or two things to enable you to get at the
area.

Once you have done that the rest is easy. Personally I would strap one fan
(or maybe two) to the *inside* of the top external fridge grill,

positioned
so that they "blow" to the outside, and I would fit a further fan on the
fridge itself, close to the little heat exchanger fins (near the top of

the
mess of fridge pipes) and positioned so that it pulls air across the fins.

These little "12 volt computer type" fans typically pull about 150
milliamps, so three of them will pull about half an amp (about the same as

a
single car sidelight bulb). It isn't a great deal, but it nevertheless
represents energy that you won't want to waste unless you actually need to
so. Therefore, you should also fit a little switch to enable you to switch
the things on and off, and preferably also a thermal switch set such that
the fans do not come on until the ambient temperature rises above a

certain
value (somewhere around 20 degrees centigrade).

Incidentally, I haven't noticed a problem myself in the kind of

temperatures
we have in England at the moment (up to about 80 degrees), even though my
fridge is very old. But then maybe the OP is talking about much higher
ambient temperatures than that, or maybe his fridge is in a very confined
space with very little "air space" at the back, or perhaps it has faulty
insulation. Does everybody have problems with fridges failing to run cold
enough?

Mike

The fridge on our 1989 Burstner needed some assistance in hot weather, but I
noted lasty year in France that tje one one fitted to our 2002 Hobby coped
without any assistance. I suspect that the efficiency of the fridge will
vary according to whether the fridge side of the van is exposed to the sun.


  #6 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 06:12 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Mike Williams
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 56
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?

"Tim Pace" wrote in message
...
I mounted them on the inside of the grill and had them blowing
colder air in after much thought as I considered if to turn them
around and have them suck warm air out. So what do you rekon
? suck or blow ?
are you a suck or blow fan !!


Well if you're planning any trips to France then I'd definitely put them on
"suck". They might help to suck out the halothane gas that some Frenchies
like to pump into your 'van while you're asleep :-)

Mike



  #7 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 06:23 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
R L Driver
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?


"Paul" wrote in message
...


I would like to know how you did this, do you have to cut the interior

of
the fridge or what ??....can you tell me exactly how you go about

fitting
a
fan please.
Thanks,
Bailey.


I have an external 12v supply near the fridge grills outside so got a
computer fan, made some hooks to hook on the grill outside and plug it in.

My Thetford fridge is a bit tight on space inside the top grill. You can
get little fan kits including thermostats to mount inside the top fridge
grill.

Further to the suck or blow debate, if you mounted the fan in the bottom
grill and sucked, the danger is all the extra dust and crap being directly
sucked in and distributed inside your van and maybe blow the flame out?

Paul


The idea Paul is to improve on the convection cooling arrangement by blowing
cold air on the cooling fins at the rear of the fridge. Or by blowing the
heated air out through the vents at the top.

My own feelings are that you are better off blowing cold air in at the
bottom, the heated air will find its way out through the top vents , my work
top area and side wall get quite hot so I am hoping that this will help it
all cool down . I think if you try and suck the heated air out , you risk
sucking cold air through the top vents at the sides of the fan and blowing
that out rather than the heated air.
Steve the grease



  #8 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 06:30 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
N Simply
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?

If your fridge isn't cooling as well as it should then take it out, turn
upside down for a few hours (at least 4) then refit and leave switched off
overnight. This helped my 10 year old fridge quite a lot - it actually gets
down to the right temperature now...

"bowtiejim" wrote in message
...

"Mike Williams" wrote in message
...
"Bailey" wrote in message
...
I would like to know how you did this, do you have to cut the interior

of
the fridge or what ??....can you tell me exactly how you go about

fitting
a
fan please.


First you have to fit a 12v DC supply lead from your normal DC supply

panel
to somewhere near the back of the fridge (you can't use the existing 12v
supply that is already on the fridge, because it is a switched supply

that
is only "live" while the engine is running). If you have an arrangement
similar to a motor home which includes a "Car Battery or Leisure

Battery"
switch then make sure that you run the supply from a point that is

supplied
whether you are switched to the main or leisure battery. Also, make sure
that the point you connect to is supplied via the existing fuse points.
Fitting this lead is the difficult bit, because you will almost

certainly
have to temporarily remove one or two things to enable you to get at the
area.

Once you have done that the rest is easy. Personally I would strap one

fan
(or maybe two) to the *inside* of the top external fridge grill,

positioned
so that they "blow" to the outside, and I would fit a further fan on the
fridge itself, close to the little heat exchanger fins (near the top of

the
mess of fridge pipes) and positioned so that it pulls air across the

fins.

These little "12 volt computer type" fans typically pull about 150
milliamps, so three of them will pull about half an amp (about the same

as
a
single car sidelight bulb). It isn't a great deal, but it nevertheless
represents energy that you won't want to waste unless you actually need

to
so. Therefore, you should also fit a little switch to enable you to

switch
the things on and off, and preferably also a thermal switch set such

that
the fans do not come on until the ambient temperature rises above a

certain
value (somewhere around 20 degrees centigrade).

Incidentally, I haven't noticed a problem myself in the kind of

temperatures
we have in England at the moment (up to about 80 degrees), even though

my
fridge is very old. But then maybe the OP is talking about much higher
ambient temperatures than that, or maybe his fridge is in a very

confined
space with very little "air space" at the back, or perhaps it has faulty
insulation. Does everybody have problems with fridges failing to run

cold
enough?

Mike

The fridge on our 1989 Burstner needed some assistance in hot weather, but

I
noted lasty year in France that tje one one fitted to our 2002 Hobby coped
without any assistance. I suspect that the efficiency of the fridge will
vary according to whether the fridge side of the van is exposed to the

sun.




  #9 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 06:47 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Capitol
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 31
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?

All fans operate most efficiently as suck devices. I'd use them on the top
exhaust grill to aid the natural convection. ie extract the heat from the
van. Outside you'd feel this as a blow.
Regards
Capitol

Tim Pace wrote in message ...
I fitted 2 12v fans to my last van and they were amazing the fridge was
fantastic in very hot weather with them on, with them off it struggled big
time. We have different van now and I have not fitted them but after this
weekend the fridge struggled a bit so b4 I go to France in 3 weeks I am
fitting them again. Last time I fitted them ( the small 12v computer fans)

I
deliberated on 1 or 2 fans I chose 2. I mounted them on the inside of the
grill and had them blowing colder air in after much thought as I considered
if to turn them around and have them suck warm air out. So what do you

rekon
? suck or blow ? 1or 2 fans ? 2 was superb who has 1 fan is it ok ?
are you a suck or blow fan !!
Tim




  #10 (permalink)  
Old July 14th 03, 06:50 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Bailey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default Fridge fan Suck or blow ?


"Mike Williams" wrote


First you have to fit a 12v DC supply lead from your normal DC supply

panel
to somewhere near the back of the fridge (you can't use the existing 12v



Thanks for that....i mibbe give it a go.
Cheers, Bailey.


 



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