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UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

low level heater used when storing van - good idea?



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 04:04 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
skintoo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?

Hi there,

I vaguely remember someone telling me he uses a low level heater that
runs of a car battery when he stores his van when it is out of use. He
said it uses about the power of a lightbulb, so it goes for a fair
while before you have to get in there and recharge the battery.

This is mainly to preserve stuff like matresses and upholstery from
mould I guess?? I'm new to this motorhome caper ( i just bought a
fantastic vehicle that i'm already crazily in love with ), but I notice
some condensation this time of year, and will probably take the
upholstery out, but wonder if this idea could be a handy alternative.

I'm just wondering if this is a common practice?

and whether people think this is worth doing?

and what kind and make of heaters people might be using??
Thanks for any info or experience

skintoo

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 04:30 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Dave Fawthrop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,941
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?

On 7 Dec 2004 09:04:02 -0800, "skintoo" wrote:

| Hi there,
|
| I vaguely remember someone telling me he uses a low level heater that
| runs of a car battery when he stores his van when it is out of use. He
| said it uses about the power of a lightbulb, so it goes for a fair
| while before you have to get in there and recharge the battery.
|
| This is mainly to preserve stuff like matresses and upholstery from
| mould I guess?? I'm new to this motorhome caper ( i just bought a
| fantastic vehicle that i'm already crazily in love with ), but I notice
| some condensation this time of year, and will probably take the
| upholstery out, but wonder if this idea could be a handy alternative.
|
| I'm just wondering if this is a common practice?
|
| and whether people think this is worth doing?
|
| and what kind and make of heaters people might be using??
| Thanks for any info or experience

My small 1998 350/2 is permanently connected to mains, for background
heating, it requires about 1000 watts to bring it up to 20 deg C when it is
freezing outside. Longer vans would require more power roughly pro rata. A
100 watt bulb would only increase the temperature by about 2 deg C. A
fully charged 110 AH leisure battery has 1320 watts of power so it would
run a 100watt light bulb for well under a day. So your plan would not
work, even if the bulb were connected via a thermostat.



--
Dave F
  #3 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 04:30 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Dave Fawthrop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,941
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?

On 7 Dec 2004 09:04:02 -0800, "skintoo" wrote:

| Hi there,
|
| I vaguely remember someone telling me he uses a low level heater that
| runs of a car battery when he stores his van when it is out of use. He
| said it uses about the power of a lightbulb, so it goes for a fair
| while before you have to get in there and recharge the battery.
|
| This is mainly to preserve stuff like matresses and upholstery from
| mould I guess?? I'm new to this motorhome caper ( i just bought a
| fantastic vehicle that i'm already crazily in love with ), but I notice
| some condensation this time of year, and will probably take the
| upholstery out, but wonder if this idea could be a handy alternative.
|
| I'm just wondering if this is a common practice?
|
| and whether people think this is worth doing?
|
| and what kind and make of heaters people might be using??
| Thanks for any info or experience

My small 1998 350/2 is permanently connected to mains, for background
heating, it requires about 1000 watts to bring it up to 20 deg C when it is
freezing outside. Longer vans would require more power roughly pro rata. A
100 watt bulb would only increase the temperature by about 2 deg C. A
fully charged 110 AH leisure battery has 1320 watts of power so it would
run a 100watt light bulb for well under a day. So your plan would not
work, even if the bulb were connected via a thermostat.



--
Dave F
  #4 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 06:37 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
skintoo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?


Dave Fawthrop wrote:
On 7 Dec 2004 09:04:02 -0800, "skintoo"

wrote:



My small 1998 350/2 is permanently connected to mains, for background
heating, it requires about 1000 watts to bring it up to 20 deg C when

it is
freezing outside. Longer vans would require more power roughly pro

rata. A
100 watt bulb would only increase the temperature by about 2 deg C.

A
fully charged 110 AH leisure battery has 1320 watts of power so it

would
run a 100watt light bulb for well under a day. So your plan would

not
work, even if the bulb were connected via a thermostat.


I think you may have misunderstood (or i'm misunderstanding you) , I'm
not suggesting leaving a light bulb on to heat the van, I was just
saying that someone told me that he knew of a low level heater that
used about the same power AS a lightbulb. Mind you, I take your point
about a battery only being able to power something that drew as much
power as a lightbulb for well under a day. - I'm monumentally
uninformed about electrical matters - but I didn't realise that a
liesure battery could only power a light bulb for less than a day...
thanks
S

  #5 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 06:37 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
skintoo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 23
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?


Dave Fawthrop wrote:
On 7 Dec 2004 09:04:02 -0800, "skintoo"

wrote:



My small 1998 350/2 is permanently connected to mains, for background
heating, it requires about 1000 watts to bring it up to 20 deg C when

it is
freezing outside. Longer vans would require more power roughly pro

rata. A
100 watt bulb would only increase the temperature by about 2 deg C.

A
fully charged 110 AH leisure battery has 1320 watts of power so it

would
run a 100watt light bulb for well under a day. So your plan would

not
work, even if the bulb were connected via a thermostat.


I think you may have misunderstood (or i'm misunderstanding you) , I'm
not suggesting leaving a light bulb on to heat the van, I was just
saying that someone told me that he knew of a low level heater that
used about the same power AS a lightbulb. Mind you, I take your point
about a battery only being able to power something that drew as much
power as a lightbulb for well under a day. - I'm monumentally
uninformed about electrical matters - but I didn't realise that a
liesure battery could only power a light bulb for less than a day...
thanks
S

  #6 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 07:08 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Roy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 703
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?

skintoo said the following on 07/12/2004 19:37:
Dave Fawthrop wrote:

On 7 Dec 2004 09:04:02 -0800, "skintoo"


wrote:


My small 1998 350/2 is permanently connected to mains, for background
heating, it requires about 1000 watts to bring it up to 20 deg C when


it is

freezing outside. Longer vans would require more power roughly pro


rata. A

100 watt bulb would only increase the temperature by about 2 deg C.


A

fully charged 110 AH leisure battery has 1320 watts of power so it


would

run a 100watt light bulb for well under a day. So your plan would


not

work, even if the bulb were connected via a thermostat.



I think you may have misunderstood (or i'm misunderstanding you) , I'm
not suggesting leaving a light bulb on to heat the van, I was just
saying that someone told me that he knew of a low level heater that
used about the same power AS a lightbulb. Mind you, I take your point
about a battery only being able to power something that drew as much
power as a lightbulb for well under a day. - I'm monumentally
uninformed about electrical matters - but I didn't realise that a
liesure battery could only power a light bulb for less than a day...
thanks
S

Probably referring to a tubular heater as used in greenhouses etc rated
at 50 - 75w as per light bulb?

Roy
  #7 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 07:08 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Roy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 703
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?

skintoo said the following on 07/12/2004 19:37:
Dave Fawthrop wrote:

On 7 Dec 2004 09:04:02 -0800, "skintoo"


wrote:


My small 1998 350/2 is permanently connected to mains, for background
heating, it requires about 1000 watts to bring it up to 20 deg C when


it is

freezing outside. Longer vans would require more power roughly pro


rata. A

100 watt bulb would only increase the temperature by about 2 deg C.


A

fully charged 110 AH leisure battery has 1320 watts of power so it


would

run a 100watt light bulb for well under a day. So your plan would


not

work, even if the bulb were connected via a thermostat.



I think you may have misunderstood (or i'm misunderstanding you) , I'm
not suggesting leaving a light bulb on to heat the van, I was just
saying that someone told me that he knew of a low level heater that
used about the same power AS a lightbulb. Mind you, I take your point
about a battery only being able to power something that drew as much
power as a lightbulb for well under a day. - I'm monumentally
uninformed about electrical matters - but I didn't realise that a
liesure battery could only power a light bulb for less than a day...
thanks
S

Probably referring to a tubular heater as used in greenhouses etc rated
at 50 - 75w as per light bulb?

Roy
  #8 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 07:27 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Dave Fawthrop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,941
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?

On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 20:08:45 +0000, Roy wrote:


| Probably referring to a tubular heater as used in greenhouses etc rated
| at 50 - 75w as per light bulb?

IME 50-75w would be too low 250 watts would be necessary giving about 5
degrees rise. Less for a longer van.
Mine uses tubular heaters of about 700 watts but it is meant as full
heating and thermostated.

I have blocked off the roof vents with bubblewrap, but remove this when we
live in it.


--
Dave F
  #9 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 07:27 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Dave Fawthrop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,941
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?

On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 20:08:45 +0000, Roy wrote:


| Probably referring to a tubular heater as used in greenhouses etc rated
| at 50 - 75w as per light bulb?

IME 50-75w would be too low 250 watts would be necessary giving about 5
degrees rise. Less for a longer van.
Mine uses tubular heaters of about 700 watts but it is meant as full
heating and thermostated.

I have blocked off the roof vents with bubblewrap, but remove this when we
live in it.


--
Dave F
  #10 (permalink)  
Old December 7th 04, 08:10 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
DaveK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 885
Default low level heater used when storing van - good idea?

This is mainly to preserve stuff like matresses and upholstery from
mould I guess?? I'm new to this motorhome caper ( i just bought a
fantastic vehicle that i'm already crazily in love with ), but I notice
some condensation this time of year, and will probably take the
upholstery out, but wonder if this idea could be a handy alternative.

If you have access to mains supply a dehumidifer will preserve your pride
and joy very well.
About 70 from B&Q, Homebase etc. Cover all the vents-including the fridge
panels. Stand the dehumidifier in the shower room and place the drip tube
over a sponge covering the waste outlet. On a timer for three hours morning
and again at night.
Cheapest method is a number of bowls with silica gel placed around and
about.
When they get damp you can dry them off in the microwave and use them again.
There are many industries that throw away bags of silica gel when they
remove the packing from imported kit. Maybe you can scrounge some.
DaveK.



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