A Caravan forum. Caravan Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Caravan Banter forum » Caravan, Motor Homes and Camping Newsgroups » UK Caravanning
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

Stabilizer bars



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 11:37 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Stephen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 14
Default Stabilizer bars

Hi All...

Is it just me or does anyone else think the same way... I have a Land Rover
Discovery and I Tow a 22' Eldis Cyclone GT single axle 5bth. Now I am fairly
new to towing tourers with cars although I have had many years experience of
towing things like bristle chippers (the machines that put stones on top of
asphalt before it's rolled in) and portable brew cabins (yeah you've seen
them on the roadside) with lorries.

The first time I took my caravan out on the road I inadvertently got to
around 75MPH with no adverse affects. Needless to say I soon slowed down to
the limit once I realised I was speeding.

The point is, I was given a used alco stabiliser bar and the thing took over
an hour to fit, due to stubborn bolts etc, and to my astonishment once it
was fit, even with the pads locked down in the towing position I could still
manoeuvre the bar by hand. Now it seems to me that it's more to do with a
properly loaded caravan and a suitably heavy towing vehicle rather than the
somewhat negligible effects that a stabiliser bar has, if any at all.

Has anyone had similar thoughts or had experience where a stabiliser bar has
actually made a difference, because to me all these things do is put
additional strain on the components attaching the towbar to the car.

Stephen...


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 12:10 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Danny
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Stabilizer bars

Stephen wrote:
-snip-
The point is, I was given a used alco stabiliser bar and the thing took over
an hour to fit, due to stubborn bolts etc, and to my astonishment once it
was fit, even with the pads locked down in the towing position I could still
manoeuvre the bar by hand. Now it seems to me that it's more to do with a
properly loaded caravan and a suitably heavy towing vehicle rather than the
somewhat negligible effects that a stabiliser bar has, if any at all.

Has anyone had similar thoughts or had experience where a stabiliser bar has
actually made a difference, because to me all these things do is put
additional strain on the components attaching the towbar to the car.


Possible that the pads are worn. Assuming you are talking about the
Al-ko hitch stabiliser and not the standard bar type.

I've got an Al-Ko 3004 hitch on the way, so I'll soon know if they are
any good or not


--
Regards,
Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.dannyscoffee.com (UK advert for my mobile espresso service)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/European online ordering for Malabar
Gold blend)
swap Z for above characters in email address to reply

  #3 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 12:10 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Danny
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 61
Default Stabilizer bars

Stephen wrote:
-snip-
The point is, I was given a used alco stabiliser bar and the thing took over
an hour to fit, due to stubborn bolts etc, and to my astonishment once it
was fit, even with the pads locked down in the towing position I could still
manoeuvre the bar by hand. Now it seems to me that it's more to do with a
properly loaded caravan and a suitably heavy towing vehicle rather than the
somewhat negligible effects that a stabiliser bar has, if any at all.

Has anyone had similar thoughts or had experience where a stabiliser bar has
actually made a difference, because to me all these things do is put
additional strain on the components attaching the towbar to the car.


Possible that the pads are worn. Assuming you are talking about the
Al-ko hitch stabiliser and not the standard bar type.

I've got an Al-Ko 3004 hitch on the way, so I'll soon know if they are
any good or not


--
Regards,
Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.dannyscoffee.com (UK advert for my mobile espresso service)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/European online ordering for Malabar
Gold blend)
swap Z for above characters in email address to reply

  #4 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 12:13 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Uno Hoo!
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 308
Default Stabilizer bars


"Stephen" wrote in message
...
Hi All...

Is it just me or does anyone else think the same way... I have a Land
Rover Discovery and I Tow a 22' Eldis Cyclone GT single axle 5bth. Now I
am fairly new to towing tourers with cars although I have had many years
experience of towing things like bristle chippers (the machines that put
stones on top of asphalt before it's rolled in) and portable brew cabins
(yeah you've seen them on the roadside) with lorries.

The first time I took my caravan out on the road I inadvertently got to
around 75MPH with no adverse affects. Needless to say I soon slowed down
to the limit once I realised I was speeding.

The point is, I was given a used alco stabiliser bar and the thing took
over an hour to fit, due to stubborn bolts etc, and to my astonishment
once it was fit, even with the pads locked down in the towing position I
could still manoeuvre the bar by hand. Now it seems to me that it's more
to do with a properly loaded caravan and a suitably heavy towing vehicle
rather than the somewhat negligible effects that a stabiliser bar has, if
any at all.

Has anyone had similar thoughts or had experience where a stabiliser bar
has actually made a difference, because to me all these things do is put
additional strain on the components attaching the towbar to the car.


Stephen

For many years I felt exactly the same as you. I bought a 'blade' stabiliser
when I began caravanning and continued to use it even though I knew other
caravanners who didn't use them. I began to feel that they were a waste of
time if your 'van was properly loaded and nose-weight properly adjusted. And
then, two years ago I decided to dispense with the stabiliser for a trip
down to Norfolk - and did I regret it! On the M6 heading South I felt a
'snake' developing on several occasions and had to ease off the throttle to
bring it under control. None of these snakes developed into anything serious
but it was sufficient to cause me great concern and so I bought another
stabiliser while I was down in Norfolk and fitted it down there for the
journey back. I've had not the slightest beginnings of a snake since then.
So despite my initial dismissal of stabilisers as totally unnecessary on
properly loaded and matched outfits - I'm now firmly of the opinion that
they are useful and necessary!

Kev


  #5 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 12:13 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Uno Hoo!
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 308
Default Stabilizer bars


"Stephen" wrote in message
...
Hi All...

Is it just me or does anyone else think the same way... I have a Land
Rover Discovery and I Tow a 22' Eldis Cyclone GT single axle 5bth. Now I
am fairly new to towing tourers with cars although I have had many years
experience of towing things like bristle chippers (the machines that put
stones on top of asphalt before it's rolled in) and portable brew cabins
(yeah you've seen them on the roadside) with lorries.

The first time I took my caravan out on the road I inadvertently got to
around 75MPH with no adverse affects. Needless to say I soon slowed down
to the limit once I realised I was speeding.

The point is, I was given a used alco stabiliser bar and the thing took
over an hour to fit, due to stubborn bolts etc, and to my astonishment
once it was fit, even with the pads locked down in the towing position I
could still manoeuvre the bar by hand. Now it seems to me that it's more
to do with a properly loaded caravan and a suitably heavy towing vehicle
rather than the somewhat negligible effects that a stabiliser bar has, if
any at all.

Has anyone had similar thoughts or had experience where a stabiliser bar
has actually made a difference, because to me all these things do is put
additional strain on the components attaching the towbar to the car.


Stephen

For many years I felt exactly the same as you. I bought a 'blade' stabiliser
when I began caravanning and continued to use it even though I knew other
caravanners who didn't use them. I began to feel that they were a waste of
time if your 'van was properly loaded and nose-weight properly adjusted. And
then, two years ago I decided to dispense with the stabiliser for a trip
down to Norfolk - and did I regret it! On the M6 heading South I felt a
'snake' developing on several occasions and had to ease off the throttle to
bring it under control. None of these snakes developed into anything serious
but it was sufficient to cause me great concern and so I bought another
stabiliser while I was down in Norfolk and fitted it down there for the
journey back. I've had not the slightest beginnings of a snake since then.
So despite my initial dismissal of stabilisers as totally unnecessary on
properly loaded and matched outfits - I'm now firmly of the opinion that
they are useful and necessary!

Kev


  #6 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 01:08 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Anne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 46
Default Stabilizer bars

For many years I felt exactly the same as you. I bought a 'blade' stabiliser
when I began caravanning and continued to use it even though I knew other
caravanners who didn't use them. I began to feel that they were a waste of
time if your 'van was properly loaded and nose-weight properly adjusted. And
then, two years ago I decided to dispense with the stabiliser for a trip
down to Norfolk - and did I regret it! On the M6 heading South I felt a
'snake' developing on several occasions and had to ease off the throttle to
bring it under control. None of these snakes developed into anything serious
but it was sufficient to cause me great concern and so I bought another
stabiliser while I was down in Norfolk and fitted it down there for the
journey back. I've had not the slightest beginnings of a snake since then.
So despite my initial dismissal of stabilisers as totally unnecessary on
properly loaded and matched outfits - I'm now firmly of the opinion that
they are useful and necessary!
Kev

I'm of the same opinion as you Kev. I only do very small trips without my
stabilizer (to and from storage yard) and even on slow moving roads and
through housing estates i can feel the difference in the vans handling. i
wouldn't dream of going down the motorway without my stabilizer.I have a
second hand bulldog stabiliser which was donated to me when i bought my van.
I am thinking about changing it for an Alko this year so hopefully the
handling will be even better
Anne



  #7 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 01:08 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Anne
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 46
Default Stabilizer bars

For many years I felt exactly the same as you. I bought a 'blade' stabiliser
when I began caravanning and continued to use it even though I knew other
caravanners who didn't use them. I began to feel that they were a waste of
time if your 'van was properly loaded and nose-weight properly adjusted. And
then, two years ago I decided to dispense with the stabiliser for a trip
down to Norfolk - and did I regret it! On the M6 heading South I felt a
'snake' developing on several occasions and had to ease off the throttle to
bring it under control. None of these snakes developed into anything serious
but it was sufficient to cause me great concern and so I bought another
stabiliser while I was down in Norfolk and fitted it down there for the
journey back. I've had not the slightest beginnings of a snake since then.
So despite my initial dismissal of stabilisers as totally unnecessary on
properly loaded and matched outfits - I'm now firmly of the opinion that
they are useful and necessary!
Kev

I'm of the same opinion as you Kev. I only do very small trips without my
stabilizer (to and from storage yard) and even on slow moving roads and
through housing estates i can feel the difference in the vans handling. i
wouldn't dream of going down the motorway without my stabilizer.I have a
second hand bulldog stabiliser which was donated to me when i bought my van.
I am thinking about changing it for an Alko this year so hopefully the
handling will be even better
Anne



  #8 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 01:24 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Dave Fawthrop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,941
Default Stabilizer bars

On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 11:37:45 +0000 (UTC), "Stephen"
wrote:


| Has anyone had similar thoughts or had experience where a stabiliser bar has
| actually made a difference,

My blade stabilizer once bounced out of its shoe, on a motorway, towing a
light van, well within all recommended and legal limits. My fault, I had
just done some ?minor? changes :-(

The outfit felt so unstable that I stopped on the hard shoulder, and saw
what was wrong. I towed *slowly* off the motorway and put things right
at the next opportunity.


--
Dave F
Howard Flight was right
  #9 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 01:24 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Dave Fawthrop
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,941
Default Stabilizer bars

On Wed, 20 Apr 2005 11:37:45 +0000 (UTC), "Stephen"
wrote:


| Has anyone had similar thoughts or had experience where a stabiliser bar has
| actually made a difference,

My blade stabilizer once bounced out of its shoe, on a motorway, towing a
light van, well within all recommended and legal limits. My fault, I had
just done some ?minor? changes :-(

The outfit felt so unstable that I stopped on the hard shoulder, and saw
what was wrong. I towed *slowly* off the motorway and put things right
at the next opportunity.


--
Dave F
Howard Flight was right
  #10 (permalink)  
Old April 20th 05, 03:21 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Budgie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 347
Default Stabilizer bars


"Stephen" wrote in message
...
Hi All...

The first time I took my caravan out on the road I inadvertently got to
around 75MPH with no adverse affects. Needless to say I soon slowed down

to
the limit once I realised I was speeding.


Which limit? Stabilisers are only 'designed' to deal with caravan speeds,
not Le Mans.

--
Budgie
NB Reply to newsgroup. Email address will get you nowhere.


 



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT. The time now is 11:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC6
Copyright 2004-2019 Caravan Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.