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UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

Wheel Bearings



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old May 21st 05, 04:03 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Mr W Z Boson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 142
Default Wheel Bearings

We have an ancient caravan ('89 Sprite Alpine) which is worked pretty
hard.

Each year, I service the hub - adjust brakes & pack bearings with
grease.

The user manual gives advice on how to re-fit the hub nut along the
following lines ...

"tighten the retaining nut until rotation is impaired, then slacken off
by 1/12 of a turn until slot is lined up with the split pin hole"

Right - well apart from pondering on the exact definition of "impaired"
when carrying out this task, it's always a compromise between erring on
the "tighter" rather than the "looser" side after judging where the
"impairement" position occurred.

I always choose the "looser" option - but one of my first tasks on on
taking the van on the road is to check the hub temperature - so
obviously I'm not too happy with this finger-in-the-air way of going
about things. Hub temperatures are always fine.

Any advice on a better way of doing things would be much appreciated.

btw, before anyone asks, the for the first service (way back) I took
the van to a local "reputable" dealer to do this. On arrival home, I
noticed a "hot" smell coming from somewhere and found the hubs running
hot enough to fry an egg. From then on, I've diy'ed.

Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old May 21st 05, 04:26 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Paula
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Wheel Bearings

On 21 May 2005 09:03:49 -0700, "Mr W Z Boson"
wrote:

We have an ancient caravan ('89 Sprite Alpine) which is worked pretty
hard.

Each year, I service the hub - adjust brakes & pack bearings with
grease.

The user manual gives advice on how to re-fit the hub nut along the
following lines ...

"tighten the retaining nut until rotation is impaired, then slacken off
by 1/12 of a turn until slot is lined up with the split pin hole"

Right - well apart from pondering on the exact definition of "impaired"
when carrying out this task, it's always a compromise between erring on
the "tighter" rather than the "looser" side after judging where the
"impairement" position occurred.


The end result should be as loose as possible but without any flexion
otherwise quicker wear will occur.


I always choose the "looser" option - but one of my first tasks on on
taking the van on the road is to check the hub temperature - so
obviously I'm not too happy with this finger-in-the-air way of going
about things. Hub temperatures are always fine.


You wont really notice a hot hub if its loose anyway, the heat occurs
when its too tight.


Any advice on a better way of doing things would be much appreciated.


I should imagine these days they have torque settings but then you
need a really good wrench that is regularly tested to be sure, even
then a bit hit and miss. It's a bit like teaching someone tone deaf to
play a guitar, you cant they either have it or not. You're doing
about the best you can.

btw, before anyone asks, the for the first service (way back) I took
the van to a local "reputable" dealer to do this. On arrival home, I
noticed a "hot" smell coming from somewhere and found the hubs running
hot enough to fry an egg. From then on, I've diy'ed.


Never trust anyone to do a good job, always do your own checks after.
Like anything in life, if you want a proper job done do it yourself.
  #3 (permalink)  
Old May 21st 05, 04:26 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Paula
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Wheel Bearings

On 21 May 2005 09:03:49 -0700, "Mr W Z Boson"
wrote:

We have an ancient caravan ('89 Sprite Alpine) which is worked pretty
hard.

Each year, I service the hub - adjust brakes & pack bearings with
grease.

The user manual gives advice on how to re-fit the hub nut along the
following lines ...

"tighten the retaining nut until rotation is impaired, then slacken off
by 1/12 of a turn until slot is lined up with the split pin hole"

Right - well apart from pondering on the exact definition of "impaired"
when carrying out this task, it's always a compromise between erring on
the "tighter" rather than the "looser" side after judging where the
"impairement" position occurred.


The end result should be as loose as possible but without any flexion
otherwise quicker wear will occur.


I always choose the "looser" option - but one of my first tasks on on
taking the van on the road is to check the hub temperature - so
obviously I'm not too happy with this finger-in-the-air way of going
about things. Hub temperatures are always fine.


You wont really notice a hot hub if its loose anyway, the heat occurs
when its too tight.


Any advice on a better way of doing things would be much appreciated.


I should imagine these days they have torque settings but then you
need a really good wrench that is regularly tested to be sure, even
then a bit hit and miss. It's a bit like teaching someone tone deaf to
play a guitar, you cant they either have it or not. You're doing
about the best you can.

btw, before anyone asks, the for the first service (way back) I took
the van to a local "reputable" dealer to do this. On arrival home, I
noticed a "hot" smell coming from somewhere and found the hubs running
hot enough to fry an egg. From then on, I've diy'ed.


Never trust anyone to do a good job, always do your own checks after.
Like anything in life, if you want a proper job done do it yourself.
  #4 (permalink)  
Old May 21st 05, 09:31 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Hitch Lock
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 692
Default Wheel Bearings

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Mr W Z Boson wrote:

We have an ancient caravan ('89 Sprite Alpine) which is worked pretty
hard.

Each year, I service the hub - adjust brakes & pack bearings with
grease.

The user manual gives advice on how to re-fit the hub nut along the
following lines ...

"tighten the retaining nut until rotation is impaired, then slacken
off by 1/12 of a turn until slot is lined up with the split pin hole"

Right - well apart from pondering on the exact definition of
"impaired" when carrying out this task, it's always a compromise
between erring on the "tighter" rather than the "looser" side after
judging where the "impairement" position occurred.

I always choose the "looser" option - but one of my first tasks on on
taking the van on the road is to check the hub temperature - so
obviously I'm not too happy with this finger-in-the-air way of going
about things. Hub temperatures are always fine.

Any advice on a better way of doing things would be much appreciated.

btw, before anyone asks, the for the first service (way back) I took
the van to a local "reputable" dealer to do this. On arrival home, I
noticed a "hot" smell coming from somewhere and found the hubs running
hot enough to fry an egg. From then on, I've diy'ed.


I have two sets of instructions for my 1991 Bailey caravan - one provided by
Bailey, and the other by chassis maker Alko - and they give different
results!

I adjust mine so that the wheel turns freely, but without any perceptible
play when grasping both sides of the tyre.

The only times I've ever overheated the hubs have been when I've
over-adjusted the brakes or - on one occasion - accidentally driven with the
handbrake on the first notch. I've always been very careful ever since to
make sure that the brake is fully off - often stopping after a few miles to
feel the brake drums.
--
Cheers,
Hitch Lock
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.


  #5 (permalink)  
Old May 21st 05, 09:31 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Hitch Lock
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 692
Default Wheel Bearings

In an earlier contribution to this discussion,
Mr W Z Boson wrote:

We have an ancient caravan ('89 Sprite Alpine) which is worked pretty
hard.

Each year, I service the hub - adjust brakes & pack bearings with
grease.

The user manual gives advice on how to re-fit the hub nut along the
following lines ...

"tighten the retaining nut until rotation is impaired, then slacken
off by 1/12 of a turn until slot is lined up with the split pin hole"

Right - well apart from pondering on the exact definition of
"impaired" when carrying out this task, it's always a compromise
between erring on the "tighter" rather than the "looser" side after
judging where the "impairement" position occurred.

I always choose the "looser" option - but one of my first tasks on on
taking the van on the road is to check the hub temperature - so
obviously I'm not too happy with this finger-in-the-air way of going
about things. Hub temperatures are always fine.

Any advice on a better way of doing things would be much appreciated.

btw, before anyone asks, the for the first service (way back) I took
the van to a local "reputable" dealer to do this. On arrival home, I
noticed a "hot" smell coming from somewhere and found the hubs running
hot enough to fry an egg. From then on, I've diy'ed.


I have two sets of instructions for my 1991 Bailey caravan - one provided by
Bailey, and the other by chassis maker Alko - and they give different
results!

I adjust mine so that the wheel turns freely, but without any perceptible
play when grasping both sides of the tyre.

The only times I've ever overheated the hubs have been when I've
over-adjusted the brakes or - on one occasion - accidentally driven with the
handbrake on the first notch. I've always been very careful ever since to
make sure that the brake is fully off - often stopping after a few miles to
feel the brake drums.
--
Cheers,
Hitch Lock
______
Please reply to newsgroup. Reply address is invalid.


  #6 (permalink)  
Old May 22nd 05, 04:52 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
DaveK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 885
Default Wheel Bearings

I always choose the "looser" option - but one of my first tasks on on
taking the van on the road is to check the hub temperature - so
obviously I'm not too happy with this finger-in-the-air way of going
about things. Hub temperatures are always fine.


Reckon your doing it right.
Nothing wrong with castle nut and split pin adjustment for wheel bearings.
Nowadays they use 'one shot' nuts and wind them up to about 260 ft lbs. A
torque wrench with that capacity is about
260 english pounds. The nuts are thrown away each time and cost about a
fiver each.
DaveK.


  #7 (permalink)  
Old May 22nd 05, 04:52 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
DaveK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 885
Default Wheel Bearings

I always choose the "looser" option - but one of my first tasks on on
taking the van on the road is to check the hub temperature - so
obviously I'm not too happy with this finger-in-the-air way of going
about things. Hub temperatures are always fine.


Reckon your doing it right.
Nothing wrong with castle nut and split pin adjustment for wheel bearings.
Nowadays they use 'one shot' nuts and wind them up to about 260 ft lbs. A
torque wrench with that capacity is about
260 english pounds. The nuts are thrown away each time and cost about a
fiver each.
DaveK.


  #8 (permalink)  
Old May 22nd 05, 05:54 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
homerh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35
Default Wheel Bearings

what's the idea for one shot nuts.
"Mr W Z Boson" wrote in message
oups.com...
We have an ancient caravan ('89 Sprite Alpine) which is worked pretty
hard.

Each year, I service the hub - adjust brakes & pack bearings with
grease.

The user manual gives advice on how to re-fit the hub nut along the
following lines ...

"tighten the retaining nut until rotation is impaired, then slacken off
by 1/12 of a turn until slot is lined up with the split pin hole"

Right - well apart from pondering on the exact definition of "impaired"
when carrying out this task, it's always a compromise between erring on
the "tighter" rather than the "looser" side after judging where the
"impairement" position occurred.

I always choose the "looser" option - but one of my first tasks on on
taking the van on the road is to check the hub temperature - so
obviously I'm not too happy with this finger-in-the-air way of going
about things. Hub temperatures are always fine.

Any advice on a better way of doing things would be much appreciated.

btw, before anyone asks, the for the first service (way back) I took
the van to a local "reputable" dealer to do this. On arrival home, I
noticed a "hot" smell coming from somewhere and found the hubs running
hot enough to fry an egg. From then on, I've diy'ed.



  #9 (permalink)  
Old May 22nd 05, 05:54 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
homerh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 35
Default Wheel Bearings

what's the idea for one shot nuts.
"Mr W Z Boson" wrote in message
oups.com...
We have an ancient caravan ('89 Sprite Alpine) which is worked pretty
hard.

Each year, I service the hub - adjust brakes & pack bearings with
grease.

The user manual gives advice on how to re-fit the hub nut along the
following lines ...

"tighten the retaining nut until rotation is impaired, then slacken off
by 1/12 of a turn until slot is lined up with the split pin hole"

Right - well apart from pondering on the exact definition of "impaired"
when carrying out this task, it's always a compromise between erring on
the "tighter" rather than the "looser" side after judging where the
"impairement" position occurred.

I always choose the "looser" option - but one of my first tasks on on
taking the van on the road is to check the hub temperature - so
obviously I'm not too happy with this finger-in-the-air way of going
about things. Hub temperatures are always fine.

Any advice on a better way of doing things would be much appreciated.

btw, before anyone asks, the for the first service (way back) I took
the van to a local "reputable" dealer to do this. On arrival home, I
noticed a "hot" smell coming from somewhere and found the hubs running
hot enough to fry an egg. From then on, I've diy'ed.



  #10 (permalink)  
Old May 22nd 05, 08:13 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
DaveK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 885
Default Wheel Bearings


"homerh" wrote in message
...
what's the idea for one shot nuts.


Makes more money for the dealers.
Part of the 'throwaway' society. My brake drums havn't been off in five
years. I check the wheel bolts for tightness and adjust the brakes by the
clicker at the back of the brake drum.
Not paying over eighty ripoff quid for a 'service' .
If it had the split pin and castle nut I would remove, check, adjust and
clean out the drum annually.
DaveK.


 



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