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UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

LPG/Propane generator



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old June 13th 05, 02:29 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Giwuken
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Posts: 5
Default LPG/Propane generator

Hello,

a year or 2 ago I came across a Natural Gas or propane powered
generator, based on a Wankel engine, with a built-in boiler.
Since thenI've searched the internet multiple times, but I can't find it
anymore.
I've heard propane powered gensets work, actually had to try hearing
them, and I believe strongly in the Wankel engine, so I'm convinced this
would fit our needs.
Anybody an idea where I could find them?
I believe the original purpose was to have it build in a boat/ship, and
supply electricity/hot water.

tnks

g
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  #2 (permalink)  
Old June 13th 05, 03:49 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Christian McArdle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 601
Default LPG/Propane generator

I believe the original purpose was to have it build in a boat/ship, and
supply electricity/hot water.


These systems often use Stirling engines, rather than Wankels. Another
useful search term for google is CHP or variations thereof. It means
"Combined Heat & Power", although it is also used in huge industrial
applications, so further refinement might be required.

The idea is that you make an electrical generator, but run your water (and
space) heating off its cooling system through a heat exchanger, so any
inefficiencies from the electrical generator don't get wasted. An additional
burner is usually provided to top up the space heating ability, which would
otherwise depend on applied electrical load.

However, there are some issues. The main ones being that they generally
provide low levels of electrical energy that are useful in reducing mains
usage over long periods, but lack the grunt of mains electricity for peak
loads, so usually need a mains electrical connection as a top up. Many won't
even run without a mains connection. However, this does not apply to all,
particularly those that were originally designed for boats.

The other main issue is that it isn't very efficient standalone as a
generator. To get the best use of it, you need to be able to make use of the
generated hot water. i.e. it works better in winter.

Christian.


  #3 (permalink)  
Old June 13th 05, 03:49 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Christian McArdle
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 601
Default LPG/Propane generator

I believe the original purpose was to have it build in a boat/ship, and
supply electricity/hot water.


These systems often use Stirling engines, rather than Wankels. Another
useful search term for google is CHP or variations thereof. It means
"Combined Heat & Power", although it is also used in huge industrial
applications, so further refinement might be required.

The idea is that you make an electrical generator, but run your water (and
space) heating off its cooling system through a heat exchanger, so any
inefficiencies from the electrical generator don't get wasted. An additional
burner is usually provided to top up the space heating ability, which would
otherwise depend on applied electrical load.

However, there are some issues. The main ones being that they generally
provide low levels of electrical energy that are useful in reducing mains
usage over long periods, but lack the grunt of mains electricity for peak
loads, so usually need a mains electrical connection as a top up. Many won't
even run without a mains connection. However, this does not apply to all,
particularly those that were originally designed for boats.

The other main issue is that it isn't very efficient standalone as a
generator. To get the best use of it, you need to be able to make use of the
generated hot water. i.e. it works better in winter.

Christian.


 



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