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UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

Major Caravan Repair



 
 
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  #1 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 09:20 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
[email protected]
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Posts: 1
Default Major Caravan Repair

We have a 91 Avondale Grampion, which is wet below the shelf. We are
drying her out with a humidifier, but since the paper has peeled off
inside, on closer inspection we have discovered the wood is rotten.
To have the front panel removed and new wood inserted the cost will be
1500 well aboth the worth of the caravan and more than we could
possibly afford, but we don't want to part company with her as she has
all the specifications exactly as we want them.

So we've decided to try and do the work our selves. Has any one doen a
major job like this and can you give us any help or advice. We know it
has to be doen under cover and that is being sorted, but we need as
much help as we can get.

We would be grateful to any one who could give us some constructive
advice and please don't say scrap her, she means the world to us and
has given us many happy breaks away.

Thanks

Gwen

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  #2 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 09:37 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
flash
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Posts: 12
Default Major Caravan Repair


wrote in message

We would be grateful to any one who could give us some constructive
advice and please don't say scrap her, she means the world to us and
has given us many happy breaks away.


Some good stuff here : http://www.alanparkers.dsl.pipex.com/caravan1.htm

I redid my motorhome and its been watertight for three years now. Its not
that technical but it is very labour intensive, hence the high charges by
dealers (that plus the need to keep dealers in flash cars).


The hardest bit is not having some sort of seizure when you first reveal the
damage.



  #3 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 09:37 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
flash
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12
Default Major Caravan Repair


wrote in message

We would be grateful to any one who could give us some constructive
advice and please don't say scrap her, she means the world to us and
has given us many happy breaks away.


Some good stuff here : http://www.alanparkers.dsl.pipex.com/caravan1.htm

I redid my motorhome and its been watertight for three years now. Its not
that technical but it is very labour intensive, hence the high charges by
dealers (that plus the need to keep dealers in flash cars).


The hardest bit is not having some sort of seizure when you first reveal the
damage.



  #4 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 10:34 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Tinkapace
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 558
Default Major Caravan Repair

I agree its not that hard at all I kept on old Musky on the road for years
doing my own damp repairs. But you are right the initial shock when you
discover the state of the wood ( and the smell) is quite shocking I
eventually gave up with it after spending more time repairing it than going
away in it. The bed frame collapsed one weekend whilst away and I repaired
it while on holiday that was the straw that broke the Camels back. Still got
800 for it after paying 2500 and keeping it it 8 years what an investment.
In fact I did pay for the first repair it cost me 350 to fit a bit of
plywood, replace the insulation and reseal the area of water ingress. next
repair I did myself for 30 finding matching wallcovering was the hardest
bit of the job.I rekon with an older style constructed van the DIY'er could
keep one on the road for ever without much problem.

--
Tim Pace
Elite Mortgage Solutions LTD
Regulated and directly authorised by the FSA (302528)
Home, Life,Travel,Caravan & Pet Insurance. All types of Mortgages.


  #5 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 10:34 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Tinkapace
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 558
Default Major Caravan Repair

I agree its not that hard at all I kept on old Musky on the road for years
doing my own damp repairs. But you are right the initial shock when you
discover the state of the wood ( and the smell) is quite shocking I
eventually gave up with it after spending more time repairing it than going
away in it. The bed frame collapsed one weekend whilst away and I repaired
it while on holiday that was the straw that broke the Camels back. Still got
800 for it after paying 2500 and keeping it it 8 years what an investment.
In fact I did pay for the first repair it cost me 350 to fit a bit of
plywood, replace the insulation and reseal the area of water ingress. next
repair I did myself for 30 finding matching wallcovering was the hardest
bit of the job.I rekon with an older style constructed van the DIY'er could
keep one on the road for ever without much problem.

--
Tim Pace
Elite Mortgage Solutions LTD
Regulated and directly authorised by the FSA (302528)
Home, Life,Travel,Caravan & Pet Insurance. All types of Mortgages.


  #6 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 11:19 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Mary Fisher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,847
Default Major Caravan Repair


wrote in message
oups.com...
We have a 91 Avondale Grampion, which is wet below the shelf. We are

drying her out with a humidifier, but since the paper has peeled off
inside, on closer inspection we have discovered the wood is rotten.
To have the front panel removed and new wood inserted the cost will be
1500 well aboth the worth of the caravan and more than we could
possibly afford, but we don't want to part company with her as she has
all the specifications exactly as we want them.

So we've decided to try and do the work our selves. Has any one doen a

major job like this and can you give us any help or advice. We know it
has to be doen under cover and that is being sorted, but we need as
much help as we can get.

We completely gutted both our (older) caravans, removing every thing and
taking the walls right back to the outer, aluminium skin.

As others have said, the major factor was the time taken but it was well
worth it, you end up knowing you've done a good job and you'll value your
'van even more than you have done.

We would be grateful to any one who could give us some constructive

advice and please don't say scrap her, she means the world to us and
has given us many happy breaks away.

If you like her don't scrap her.

We removed all the furniture and fittings then did one section at a time.
You really do need to trace ALL the rot back as far as it extends, it's no
use just doing a little patch. You might find that it extends round the
corner. Our skeleton wasn't rotten all the way round, we're just masochists!

Do it a section at a time - one end, half a wall or, if you're lucky, just
the small part which is rotten. Removing the furniture in front of it, even
if you are doing a small part, is advisable to give room to work and save
your back. The only problem with caravans is the shortage of space, every
scrap is used to its best advantage but at the expense of lack of working
room for maintenance..

Remove the inside wall and consider the original construction careful, don't
do anything in a hurry. Replace the problem area as near as possible to the
original construction (we didn't but we were doing the lot).

I don't know why you think it has to be done under cover, we didn't, but you
could need space for tools, perhaps a workmate, GOOD (i.e. mains) lighting,
power points, space for teacups ... take out ALL the soft furnishings -
curtains, loose covers, cushions etc because you'll generate dust. It would
be a good idea to have masks and certainly have gloves - at the very least
vinyl gloves. Also have a supply of water and cleaning cloths, paint cleaner
(if you intend painting), silicone sealant, rubbish bags ...

The key is to plan ahead. Measure everything, go through the processes on
paper and make lists of everything you'll need to save frustration while
doing the job. Allow time - and take photographs of every step for your
later satisfaction.

If you have the older construction, with wooden skeleton and fairly loose
insulation, contact me privately and I'll tell you exactly what we did, it
was a long story and not really suitable for the ng because of that.

Do it, though, and enjoy your handiwork. And let us know how you get on.

Mary


  #7 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 11:19 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Mary Fisher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,847
Default Major Caravan Repair


wrote in message
oups.com...
We have a 91 Avondale Grampion, which is wet below the shelf. We are

drying her out with a humidifier, but since the paper has peeled off
inside, on closer inspection we have discovered the wood is rotten.
To have the front panel removed and new wood inserted the cost will be
1500 well aboth the worth of the caravan and more than we could
possibly afford, but we don't want to part company with her as she has
all the specifications exactly as we want them.

So we've decided to try and do the work our selves. Has any one doen a

major job like this and can you give us any help or advice. We know it
has to be doen under cover and that is being sorted, but we need as
much help as we can get.

We completely gutted both our (older) caravans, removing every thing and
taking the walls right back to the outer, aluminium skin.

As others have said, the major factor was the time taken but it was well
worth it, you end up knowing you've done a good job and you'll value your
'van even more than you have done.

We would be grateful to any one who could give us some constructive

advice and please don't say scrap her, she means the world to us and
has given us many happy breaks away.

If you like her don't scrap her.

We removed all the furniture and fittings then did one section at a time.
You really do need to trace ALL the rot back as far as it extends, it's no
use just doing a little patch. You might find that it extends round the
corner. Our skeleton wasn't rotten all the way round, we're just masochists!

Do it a section at a time - one end, half a wall or, if you're lucky, just
the small part which is rotten. Removing the furniture in front of it, even
if you are doing a small part, is advisable to give room to work and save
your back. The only problem with caravans is the shortage of space, every
scrap is used to its best advantage but at the expense of lack of working
room for maintenance..

Remove the inside wall and consider the original construction careful, don't
do anything in a hurry. Replace the problem area as near as possible to the
original construction (we didn't but we were doing the lot).

I don't know why you think it has to be done under cover, we didn't, but you
could need space for tools, perhaps a workmate, GOOD (i.e. mains) lighting,
power points, space for teacups ... take out ALL the soft furnishings -
curtains, loose covers, cushions etc because you'll generate dust. It would
be a good idea to have masks and certainly have gloves - at the very least
vinyl gloves. Also have a supply of water and cleaning cloths, paint cleaner
(if you intend painting), silicone sealant, rubbish bags ...

The key is to plan ahead. Measure everything, go through the processes on
paper and make lists of everything you'll need to save frustration while
doing the job. Allow time - and take photographs of every step for your
later satisfaction.

If you have the older construction, with wooden skeleton and fairly loose
insulation, contact me privately and I'll tell you exactly what we did, it
was a long story and not really suitable for the ng because of that.

Do it, though, and enjoy your handiwork. And let us know how you get on.

Mary


  #8 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 02:54 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Tinkapace
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 558
Default Major Caravan Repair

Couldn't agree more Mary if you have the time it's well the effort. I Just
ran out of it with my old Musky

--
Tim Pace
Elite Mortgage Solutions LTD
Regulated and directly authorised by the FSA (302528)
Home, Life,Travel,Caravan & Pet Insurance. All types of Mortgages.


  #9 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 02:54 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Tinkapace
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 558
Default Major Caravan Repair

Couldn't agree more Mary if you have the time it's well the effort. I Just
ran out of it with my old Musky

--
Tim Pace
Elite Mortgage Solutions LTD
Regulated and directly authorised by the FSA (302528)
Home, Life,Travel,Caravan & Pet Insurance. All types of Mortgages.


  #10 (permalink)  
Old July 1st 05, 03:08 PM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Gwen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 19
Default Major Caravan Repair



flash wrote:
wrote in message

We would be grateful to any one who could give us some constructive
advice and please don't say scrap her, she means the world to us and
has given us many happy breaks away.


Some good stuff here : http://www.alanparkers.dsl.pipex.com/caravan1.htm

I redid my motorhome and its been watertight for three years now. Its not
that technical but it is very labour intensive, hence the high charges by
dealers (that plus the need to keep dealers in flash cars).


The hardest bit is not having some sort of seizure when you first reveal the
damage.


The caravan rebuild looked brilliant, but the thought of ripping out
all the interior woodwork was not appealing. However it was very
useful and I've printed out the bits I think I will need, especially
the front panel bit.

So thanks for that, just shows what you can do with a bit of patience
and a bit more time, hopefully it's only going to be the front that's
the problem. Fingers crossed.

Thanks again

 



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