A Caravan forum. Caravan Banter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » Caravan Banter forum » Caravan, Motor Homes and Camping Newsgroups » UK Caravanning
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

UK Caravanning (uk.rec.caravanning) A forum for the discussion of caravanning undertaken by residents of the United Kingdom, whether in the UK or abroad. It encourages the interchange of views on the merits of models of caravan, makes of tow car, accessories, caravan sites, caravan clubs, and other related topics. The term caravan is to include trailer vans, motor caravans and trailer tents.

Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?



 
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 08:22 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Cliff Top
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 49
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?

I have a Subaru Legacy sport estate, which as a car , rides level, but with
the normal noseweight and some luggage and perhaps 2 rear seat passengers,
is decidedly low at the rear. The suspension on the car is obviously more
for handling as a sports car (I can vouch for that) , but wondered if the
Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the attitude problem
when towing?

http://www.springassisters.co.uk/menu.htm

From new the car sat level, rather than the tail up stance you often see
with estate cars. It handles the weight fine, (except when fully loaded with
boxes of wine say), so will the inserts act as a temporary fix when towing?
or would fresh springs be a better option- ? I don't want to permanently
compromise the good handling of the car for the rest of the year.

Cheers
Andrew


Ads
  #2 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 08:39 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,622
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?


"Cliff Top" wrote in message
...
I have a Subaru Legacy sport estate, which as a car , rides level, but with
the normal noseweight and some luggage and perhaps 2 rear seat passengers,
is decidedly low at the rear. The suspension on the car is obviously more
for handling as a sports car (I can vouch for that) , but wondered if the
Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the attitude problem
when towing?


Many years ago I used to fit Monroe Load levelling rear shock absorbers to
my cars. But when I got an Vauxhall Astra I could not find them anymore.
I then used the rubber inserts, bit of an effort getting then in, not helped
by the working possition one is in. Worked for me OK.
Then I got my first NEW car a Ford Escort Estate I went to my main dealer
and he asked the Ford Computer about asked it about rear suspention for
towing , it told him to fit a heavy duty rear springs. I thought by haveing
an estate it would have different springs to the car version but they do
not.
had them fitted and they were great.

I would suggest you ask your main dealer to ask the maker what they recomend
for towing first then decide what to use.

--
Regards
David

Please reply to News Group


  #3 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 08:39 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,622
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?


"Cliff Top" wrote in message
...
I have a Subaru Legacy sport estate, which as a car , rides level, but with
the normal noseweight and some luggage and perhaps 2 rear seat passengers,
is decidedly low at the rear. The suspension on the car is obviously more
for handling as a sports car (I can vouch for that) , but wondered if the
Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the attitude problem
when towing?


Many years ago I used to fit Monroe Load levelling rear shock absorbers to
my cars. But when I got an Vauxhall Astra I could not find them anymore.
I then used the rubber inserts, bit of an effort getting then in, not helped
by the working possition one is in. Worked for me OK.
Then I got my first NEW car a Ford Escort Estate I went to my main dealer
and he asked the Ford Computer about asked it about rear suspention for
towing , it told him to fit a heavy duty rear springs. I thought by haveing
an estate it would have different springs to the car version but they do
not.
had them fitted and they were great.

I would suggest you ask your main dealer to ask the maker what they recomend
for towing first then decide what to use.

--
Regards
David

Please reply to News Group


  #4 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 08:39 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
David
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,622
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?


"Cliff Top" wrote in message
...
I have a Subaru Legacy sport estate, which as a car , rides level, but with
the normal noseweight and some luggage and perhaps 2 rear seat passengers,
is decidedly low at the rear. The suspension on the car is obviously more
for handling as a sports car (I can vouch for that) , but wondered if the
Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the attitude problem
when towing?


Many years ago I used to fit Monroe Load levelling rear shock absorbers to
my cars. But when I got an Vauxhall Astra I could not find them anymore.
I then used the rubber inserts, bit of an effort getting then in, not helped
by the working possition one is in. Worked for me OK.
Then I got my first NEW car a Ford Escort Estate I went to my main dealer
and he asked the Ford Computer about asked it about rear suspention for
towing , it told him to fit a heavy duty rear springs. I thought by haveing
an estate it would have different springs to the car version but they do
not.
had them fitted and they were great.

I would suggest you ask your main dealer to ask the maker what they recomend
for towing first then decide what to use.

--
Regards
David

Please reply to News Group


  #5 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 08:52 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
DaveK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 885
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?

wondered if the Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the
attitude problem
when towing?

I put similar rubber donuts on the springs of a Cavalier some years ago.
Were excellent but made the rear end a bit jiggly when driving solo. Might
be a bit much on a car that stiff rear suspension as standard.
Used Monroe adjustable shock absorbers on a Renault 19, you inflate them via
a valve in the boot with a garage tyre inflator.
They were good, but felt they needed a bit more than the red line on the
gauge allowed when fully loaded. (But that was when we did the ferry dash
beer and wine trips).
Have a look at Demon Tweeks, they have all the answers.
DaveK.



  #6 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 08:52 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
DaveK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 885
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?

wondered if the Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the
attitude problem
when towing?

I put similar rubber donuts on the springs of a Cavalier some years ago.
Were excellent but made the rear end a bit jiggly when driving solo. Might
be a bit much on a car that stiff rear suspension as standard.
Used Monroe adjustable shock absorbers on a Renault 19, you inflate them via
a valve in the boot with a garage tyre inflator.
They were good, but felt they needed a bit more than the red line on the
gauge allowed when fully loaded. (But that was when we did the ferry dash
beer and wine trips).
Have a look at Demon Tweeks, they have all the answers.
DaveK.



  #7 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 08:52 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
DaveK
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 885
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?

wondered if the Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the
attitude problem
when towing?

I put similar rubber donuts on the springs of a Cavalier some years ago.
Were excellent but made the rear end a bit jiggly when driving solo. Might
be a bit much on a car that stiff rear suspension as standard.
Used Monroe adjustable shock absorbers on a Renault 19, you inflate them via
a valve in the boot with a garage tyre inflator.
They were good, but felt they needed a bit more than the red line on the
gauge allowed when fully loaded. (But that was when we did the ferry dash
beer and wine trips).
Have a look at Demon Tweeks, they have all the answers.
DaveK.



  #8 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 09:11 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Russ765
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 22
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?


"davek" wrote in message
...
wondered if the Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the
attitude problem
when towing?

I put similar rubber donuts on the springs of a Cavalier some years ago.
Were excellent but made the rear end a bit jiggly when driving solo. Might
be a bit much on a car that stiff rear suspension as standard.
Used Monroe adjustable shock absorbers on a Renault 19, you inflate them

via
a valve in the boot with a garage tyre inflator.
They were good, but felt they needed a bit more than the red line on the
gauge allowed when fully loaded. (But that was when we did the ferry dash
beer and wine trips).
Have a look at Demon Tweeks, they have all the answers.
DaveK.


One thing to remember as well, if the car is under a dealer warranty then

any modification can cause the warranty to be void. so as others have said
make the dealer your first port of call


  #9 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 09:11 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Russ765
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 22
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?


"davek" wrote in message
...
wondered if the Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the
attitude problem
when towing?

I put similar rubber donuts on the springs of a Cavalier some years ago.
Were excellent but made the rear end a bit jiggly when driving solo. Might
be a bit much on a car that stiff rear suspension as standard.
Used Monroe adjustable shock absorbers on a Renault 19, you inflate them

via
a valve in the boot with a garage tyre inflator.
They were good, but felt they needed a bit more than the red line on the
gauge allowed when fully loaded. (But that was when we did the ferry dash
beer and wine trips).
Have a look at Demon Tweeks, they have all the answers.
DaveK.


One thing to remember as well, if the car is under a dealer warranty then

any modification can cause the warranty to be void. so as others have said
make the dealer your first port of call


  #10 (permalink)  
Old March 6th 06, 09:11 AM posted to uk.rec.caravanning
Russ765
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 22
Default Anyone used Rubber spring assisters?


"davek" wrote in message
...
wondered if the Grayston engineering rubber assisters would help with the
attitude problem
when towing?

I put similar rubber donuts on the springs of a Cavalier some years ago.
Were excellent but made the rear end a bit jiggly when driving solo. Might
be a bit much on a car that stiff rear suspension as standard.
Used Monroe adjustable shock absorbers on a Renault 19, you inflate them

via
a valve in the boot with a garage tyre inflator.
They were good, but felt they needed a bit more than the red line on the
gauge allowed when fully loaded. (But that was when we did the ferry dash
beer and wine trips).
Have a look at Demon Tweeks, they have all the answers.
DaveK.


One thing to remember as well, if the car is under a dealer warranty then

any modification can cause the warranty to be void. so as others have said
make the dealer your first port of call


 



Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT. The time now is 01:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.0.0 RC6
Copyright 2004-2019 Caravan Banter.
The comments are property of their posters.